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James Tanton
An Aussie fellow promoting uplifting joyful genuine math thinking and doing for students & teachers alike. Honored: reaching millions!
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James Tanton retweeted
Hilary Kreisberg Dec 6
James, you’d be so excited to be in this session by Cornelius de Groot
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James Tanton retweeted
Beagle Learning 12h
Replying to @beaglelearning
Some pictures on Turner Bohlen's talk about quantifying critical thinking with Natural Next Questions!
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James Tanton retweeted
Lisa May Dec 11
An impressive panel for the Not So Hidden Figures event
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James Tanton retweeted
Lindy Elkins-Tanton Dec 11
It’s ⁦⁩ being interviewed at ⁦⁩ on the future of education - skills for the modern world. ⁦
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James Tanton retweeted
Sarah Rovito Dec 11
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James Tanton retweeted
Lindy Elkins-Tanton 12h
In ten min ⁦⁩ will show our latest research on quantifying critical thinking with Natural Next Questions! ⁩ ⁦
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James Tanton 17h
Consider the grid of points with integer coordinates. One can a draw circle with just 1 grid point on its perimeter. One can draw a circle with precisely 2 grid points on its perimeter. Is there a circle with precisely 3 grid points on its perimeter? (4? 5?)
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James Tanton retweeted
Kiran Bacche 20h
A fun activity for students : Pick up a number chit from the bowl and figure out the divisibility rule for that number using Exploding Dots.
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James Tanton Dec 11
It really is about the power of symmetry! My clunky notes and videos are here: Enjoy!
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James Tanton retweeted
Luc Goudreault Dec 11
Do you have an inspiration board? Here’s my top 10 ways to stay creative: 1.Listen to music 2.Leave space for others to speak 3.Meditate 4.Cook new recipies 5. Read books 6.Create DIY deco for Xmas 7. Play guitar 8.Don’t judge 9.Ask questions 10.Use mind maps What’s your top 10?
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James Tanton Dec 11
Prove that a circle with center (sqrt(2), sqrt(3)) has at most one point with integer coordinates on its perimeter.
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James Tanton Dec 10
Consider a square lattice of grid points. For each N is there sure to be a circle in the plane that avoids grid points but contains with precisely N grid points in its interior?
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Kiran Bacche Dec 10
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James Tanton retweeted
Ignacio Larrosa Dec 9
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James Tanton Dec 9
Woohoo! Exploding Dots! (And cool maths!)
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James Tanton retweeted
Chantal Malette Dec 9
Some Sunday morning mathing for your problem solving brains! Pairs well with coffee!
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James Tanton Dec 9
A great way to test one's intuition is to "go to extremes". What if a and b are both zero? (What would the parallelogram be then?) What if a and b were both one-half? (What would the parallelogram be then?) What if one is zero and the other is a one-half? etc.
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James Tanton retweeted
Chris Bolognese Dec 9
Replying to @jamestanton
Here's a link to play with:
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James Tanton Dec 9
Carrying on from yesterday: What condition on a and b ensures that the orange parallelogram takes up half the area of the square?
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James Tanton retweeted
Kiran Bacche Dec 9
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