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James Clear
Author of the NYT bestseller, Atomic Habits (). I write about habits and continuous improvement. Join my free weekly newsletter:
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James Clear 2h
Replying to @then_there_was
Assuming you are citing the source, typically you can quote passages up to 750 words without needing licensing permission.
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James Clear 2h
Replying to @eriktorenberg
As far as non-obvious things to say yes to: Ironically, it’s often things that are so obvious they get overlooked. -Say yes to 8 hours of sleep -Say yes to waking outside -Say yes to writing thank you notes And yet these are the first things to get swept aside when we get busy.
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James Clear 2h
Replying to @eriktorenberg
I think the answer to your original question is: When deciding what to spend time on: -Say no as the default -Siver’s “hell yes” or “no” -Prioritize asymmetric opportunities When managing your time: -Ivy Lee Method (prioritized to-do list) -Eisenhower Box (urgent vs important)
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James Clear 2h
Replying to @eriktorenberg
Also worth noting: In most fields, you have to go through a period where you say yes to nearly every opportunity before you can earn the right to say no to nearly every opportunity. More on Yes vs. No here:
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James Clear 2h
Replying to @eriktorenberg
Learning to say no doesn't mean never saying yes. It just means no is the default. Say no to whatever isn't leading you toward your goals (and yes to what does). If you have more opportunities than you can handle, prioritize the opportunities that provide asymmetric return.
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James Clear 2h
Replying to @eriktorenberg
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James Clear 8h
Replying to @RealDavidLester
Enjoy brother.
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James Clear retweeted
Jenni Kowal 9h
Just finished Atomic Habits by . I already want re-read it to soak in all of its glory. If you're gonna read any book this Spring, let this be the one!
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James Clear 9h
You can be happy with who you are and still want to be better. You can love your body and still want to improve it. You can appreciate your financial state and still want to improve it. Progress doesn’t require self-loathing. You can feel successful along the way.
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James Clear retweeted
Rocco LaCivita 24h
VERY excited to start reading both of these! Question is which one first? Atomic Habits by or Sapiens by 🤔🤔🤔decisions...decisions... 📚
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James Clear Mar 25
Replying to @morganhousel
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James Clear Mar 24
The ultimate productivity hack is saying no.
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James Clear Mar 23
No worries. He does great work and should be rightly acknowledged for it.
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James Clear Mar 23
BJ is great! Not sure if you meant it this way, but I think "took" sends the wrong message. He is cited in Ch 5, the Acknowledgements, and multiple times in the endnotes of Atomic Habits. He also had a chance to read all of those sections and provide feedback before publishing.
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James Clear Mar 23
Replying to @impcapital
Letters from a Self-Made Merchant to His Son by Lorimer The Quest of the Simple Life by Dawson Manual for Living by Epictetus
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James Clear Mar 23
In a world of hot takes and strong opinions, it can be easy to feel like you *have* to take a side on every issue. "I don't know" should be an acceptable answer. Here are some other good ones...
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James Clear Mar 23
Replying to @diyshiva @i_amm_nobody
What are some examples (besides Bitcoin/crypto)?
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James Clear Mar 22
You teach people how to treat you by what you let them get away with.
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James Clear Mar 22
Replying to @tmmiran
Portuguese is coming soon as well.
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James Clear Mar 21
Replying to @mrpaolo7
Yes! 35+ languages (including German) coming over the next year or so.
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