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Steve Salerno
Sanity is losing, people. Sanity is losing. Ethnic-studies-inflected math. From an actual Seattle schools K-12 curriculum. Enlarge and browse this. Then weep. Ex: "Can you recognize and name oppressive mathematical practices..."? .

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Michael Feldstein Oct 1
Here's an example of oppressive mathematical practices Easy to shake your head at images like that but in context they probably make a lot more sense.
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Steve Salerno Oct 1
There's a diff between critiquing the potentially oppressive USE of numbers and critiquing the value of the numbers themselves. Unilever may be using its 25K data points in a dubious way, but we all agree that 25,000 is more than 24,900. If we don't, we can't run a viable society
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Greg Nelson Oct 1
This is true. At the same time I don't think it's a necessary conclusion that classes are doing so given the questions you posted - am I wrong there? Maybe you have some experience with teachers actually doing that you can share? Or evidence people are doing so?
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Steve Salerno Oct 1
I’ve written quite a bit about the climate in schools and the partiality to what’s known as grievance studies, and a frankly anti-white atmosphere in classrooms, especially as you get into high school and secondary school. So yes I’m drawing inferences but not unwarranted I think
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Deforester Kelly Oct 1
It's Seattle. Sanity has long left the building.
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Steve Salerno Oct 1
So I've heard. One of my favorite followers lives in the area and reports frequently on the degradation of daily life there. Seattle was always considered one of America's most engaging and livable cities. No longer, it sounds like.
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gborchardUNLV Sep 30
"In individuals, insanity is rare; but in groups, parties, nations and epochs, it is the rule." Friedrich Nietzsche
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Steve Salerno Sep 30
Such a cynic, that Fred. Who knows. Maybe he’ll be right about it making us stronger.
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epobirs Sep 30
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Marketplace Fairness Sep 30
It doesn't look like this is to put in math classes. It looks like some possible things to discuss in an ethnic studies class that pertains to math.
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htowsner Oct 1
As others have pointed out, this appears to be math inflected ethnic studies, rather than the reverse. Also, speaking as a mathematician and a teacher of mathematics, a lot of these are great questions that would be helpful to students learning math.
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elseif Oct 1
I really like “Who gets to say if an answer is right?” Classrooms tend to turn into places where the teacher is the sole arbiter of right and wrong, and that interferes with teaching students to think of mathematics as something they can justify and verify for themselves.
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Steve Salerno Oct 1
I think your tweet confuses the issue. It's not a case of the teacher being the "sole arbiter," is it? Aren't there inherently right and wrong answers in math? Don't there *have* to be for life to work? Is it really the student's right to "justify" whether 2+2 really =4?
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elseif Oct 1
First, there aren't always clearcut right answers in math; 2+2=4 isn't very representative of what most grade school math looks like, let alone high school or college math.
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elseif Oct 1
Second, even when there is a clear answer, it doesn't mean it's good pedagogy for the teacher to act as an oracle for what that answer is.
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Steve Salerno Oct 1
Fair enough. I don't think we're apt to have a meeting of minds here.
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James Palmer Sep 30
Fortunately K-12 educators have a dismal record of success.
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MariaKouloglou Sep 30
I can confirm that as a student, I always found math to be oppressive. Abolish math!
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