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Izetta Autumn Mobley
Cultural historian studying race, slavery, gender & disability. Visual culture disciplinist. Museum studies. Lover of all things D.C. Tweets are my own.
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Izetta Autumn Mobley retweeted
Dr. Bettina Judd Aug 23
Published a chapter on Lucille Clifton’s practice of automatic writing as a spiritual technology that challenges what we call knowledge in this new edited collection:
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Izetta Autumn Mobley retweeted
Steven Nelson Aug 22
I will give two pop-up talks on Alma Thomas's 1969 work, "Pansies in Washington," at NGANights on Thursday, Sept. 12. Join the fun! Register here:
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Izetta Autumn Mobley retweeted
D Lev Aug 22
Hi twitter! I have space on my syllabus for a few more readings on patient experience/narrative of medical uncertainty. Do you have any favorites for me and my students? I'd love to read something new with them...
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Izetta Autumn Mobley Aug 22
The discussion of how "Jim Crow" got its name from T. Rice is important. Framing a Black man (real or imagined) as "crippled" replicates the inherent ableism of slavery. Slavery and disability were tightly linked. Even our language replicates those power dynamics.
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Izetta Autumn Mobley retweeted
Mark Anthony Neal Aug 22
How Segregation Caused Your Traffic Jam
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Izetta Autumn Mobley retweeted
Steven Nelson Aug 22
If you're interested in having a hard copy of the magazine's , you can purchase it at their store.
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1A Aug 22
Replying to @lindavillarosa
wrote about medicine in slavery. As early in 2016, a study showed medical students tend to believe black people have a higher tolerance for pain and thicker skin than white people.
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Izetta Autumn Mobley Aug 22
Replying to @1a @nhannahjones
I don't think we can understand the history of this country without understanding slavery and its context. In my experience working in public history, there are often significant gaps re: what people know. We often think we know what slavery was, but we don't
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Izetta Autumn Mobley Aug 22
Replying to @1a @nhannahjones
One of the things that strikes me about the is the key role Virginia plays in slavery. Tobacco, produced via enslaved labor, was a major crop of Virginia. The most profitable slave trader in the U.S. was located in Alexandria - @ the time part of DC. 2/
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Izetta Autumn Mobley Aug 22
is featuring as she discusses how the came to be. This is a much-needed conversation. As someone who works in public history, I think conversations about history are critical. This is a must-listen: 1/
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Izetta Autumn Mobley retweeted
1A Aug 22
We're live with , talking about the . and will join us soon.
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Izetta Autumn Mobley Aug 21
Here is my blanket apology for being late. I am committed to using public transit b/c I believe it's a crucial public good & I am trying to reduce my environmental impact. But I live in a city w/a flailing system. So, no matter how I plan, I'll likely be late.
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Izetta Autumn Mobley Aug 20
It's here! It's here! It's here! Spending time with this wonder. In awe . Thank you for your brilliance.
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Izetta Autumn Mobley retweeted
IMLS Aug 20
Thanks for featuring our new Deputy Director of Library Services, Cynthia Landrum. Great interview!
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Izetta Autumn Mobley retweeted
The DC Oral History Collaborative Aug 20
The DC Oral History Collaborative and Hola Cultura invite you to join us on September 8, as part of the Adams Morgan Day festivities, to explore the evolution of the Latinx Community in Adams Morgan through the accounts of local residents!
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nicole n. ivy Aug 20
Yes Helynsia! keeps doing the work!
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Izetta Autumn Mobley retweeted
LaTanya S. Autry Aug 20
Leanne Betasamosake Simpson: “This is a manifesto to create networks of reciprocal resurgent movements with other humans and nonhumans radically imagining their ways out of domination, who are not afraid to let those imaginings destroy the pillars of settler colonialism.”
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Izetta Autumn Mobley retweeted
Nate ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Aug 19
Since I know a lot of folks, not just teachers, will be interested but weren't able to get a physical copy, the Pulitzer Center has the entire issue of The 1619 Project (.pdf) for free right here, along with reading guides and all sorts of extras
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Izetta Autumn Mobley retweeted
Black Identity Extremist Aug 20
🚨🚨🚨 The whole 1619 project is available in PDF.
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Izetta Autumn Mobley retweeted
SmithsonianFolklife Aug 20
The Africans arriving in Virginia spoke many languages, including Igbo, Efik, Ijo, Wolof, Manding, and Pular. Without a common language, they began to derive a sense of community from common conditions and cultural similarities. Read more:
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