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immad
Now: CEO, Founder . Was: PT Partner , Founder . Investor: , , 100+
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immad Dec 7
Replying to @jmj
But anyone who is likely to share the deck can rip a docsend anyway. It’s trivial...
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immad Dec 7
Replying to @jmj
I personally dislike receiving docsends. I wonder if the upside in tracking investors is actually worth the downside of annoying the receiver. Feels like both the upside and downside are fairly minor. I don’t really get docsend, maybe I am just old...
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immad Dec 7
Replying to @jmj
A) abstractly, once you give access to knowledge then the receiver should have a right to keep it. B) when you back someone it’s good to see original deck to see how they are tracking to plans. Perhaps the investor should disclaim this upfront to be transparent.
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immad Dec 7
Replying to @jmj
Why is that questionable?
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immad Dec 7
Never heard the phrase “culture jam”. It’s like a variant to newsjacking. I like it.
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immad Dec 5
3rd annual Christmas party Getting classy!
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immad Dec 3
Perhaps this would work
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immad Dec 3
Going to be on this Webinar with in 1 hour. I am going to mostly be talking about the art (and a little science) of projecting revenues and budgeting costs for a startup.
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immad retweeted
Xpo.Network Dec 2
1/ In the 21st Edition of Breakout Startups, we are covering , the startup building a bank for startups. 
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immad Dec 1
Replying to @cm_parker
Did that work?
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immad Dec 1
Replying to @stevegraham
The fact that non founder CEOs lead to companies going downhill is well within prevailing SF wisdom. It’s a bit more nuanced and worth reading the book rather than trying to hash it out on Twitter. The idea is to have some checks on their own competitive culture.
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immad Dec 1
Replying to @stevegraham
You don’t think there was any issue with their culture?
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immad Nov 30
Replying to @immad
5/ The whole book is worth a read but that was one of the most powerful takeaways for me:
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immad Nov 30
Replying to @immad
4/ Now that I have heard the idea of cultural values taken to the extreme lead to these issues it explains a lot of issues we see with larger companies. Like Google wants to organize data above every other virtue even when organizing private data has negative issues etc
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immad Nov 30
Replying to @immad
3/ B is rather graceful and the example given is that Japanese/Samurai culture promotes politeness above all else but also states politeness without sincerity is meaningless
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immad Nov 30
Replying to @immad
2/ The solution presented in the book seems to be two fold A) avoid one word cultural values and go into depth on how to inact and not inact them B) have a second cultural value that counters the firsts negative tendacy
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immad Nov 30
1/ Ben Horowitz’s new book makes a compelling argument that that your company’s greatest cultural strength, when taken to its extreme, can be its greatest weakness. The example in the book is Uber prioritizing competition over all else.
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immad retweeted
Naval Nov 29
Replying to @Austen
Exclusive access to desirable land is a zero-sum game. Educational credentials are partially a zero-sum game. Healthcare and education have third party payers. Infinite demand for healthcare as outcomes are non-ergodic. Maybe these sectors tend to absorb all excess capital.
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immad Nov 30
Replying to @paulbohm
It wouldn’t solve the narrative unless every country also had a very free immigration policy.
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immad Nov 30
Replying to @paulbohm
I am not sold that these decades away projections will play out exactly like this. Did population projections of the US/other countries from 80 years ago match reality at all?
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