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Museum Wars!

#AskACurator day got a little heated!
Boonarz O'Connell 👻 Sep 13
Who would win in a staff battle between and , what exhibits/items would help you be victorious?
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 13
Replying to @bednarz @sciencemuseum
We have dinosaurs. No contest.
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Science Museum Sep 13
is full of old fossils, but we have robots, a Spitfire and ancient poisons. Boom!
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 13
Replying to @sciencemuseum
We have robot dinosaurs, Pterodactyls and the most venomous creatures on Earth. Plus volcanoes and earthquakes ... And vampire fish.
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Science Museum Sep 13
Replying to @NHM_London
What about this merman & we do have a Polaris nuclear missile as Khalil says!
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 13
Replying to @sciencemuseum
Jenny Haniver sees your merman, never bring a nuke to an earth-shattering meteorite fight, and our cockroach specimens w/ survive us all ;)
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Science Museum Sep 13
Replying to @NHM_London
We see your cockroach and... whack it with a welly
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 13
Replying to @sciencemuseum
There is never just one cockroach. And we quietly melt your plastics with our lava.
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Science Museum Sep 13
Replying to @NHM_London
We'll (hopefully) fight your lava with all our fire engines
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 13
Replying to @sciencemuseum
*Game of Thrones theme music* Send in the (sea)-dragons... (from The Book of the Great Sea-Dragons by Thomas Hawkins, 1840).
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Boonarz O'Connell 👻 Sep 13
I feel sorry for having to listen to all this arguing from their neighbours.
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V&A Sep 13
Guys... we are all friends here at Exhibition Road!
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Science Museum Sep 13
Replying to @NHM_London
We see your dragons and have escaped in this bathyscaphe
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 13
Replying to @sciencemuseum
It may be a good idea to avoid our Fossil Marine Reptiles gallery in that. Chomp, chomp:
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Boonarz O'Connell 👻 Sep 13
Shall we call a draw then? Shake hands, go home and have a nice cuppa tea.
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 13
Replying to @bednarz @sciencemuseum
Erm... oh, okay then.
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Science Museum Sep 14
Replying to @NHM_London @bednarz
We were all set to call it a draw, but then we saw this. Turns out, we have a dinosaur AND it's 3D printed!
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 14
Replying to @sciencemuseum @bednarz
OK, we weren't going to do this, but here come the locusts... Phymateus viridipes, Phymateus karschi, and Ornithacris pictula magnifica...
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 14
Replying to @sciencemuseum @bednarz
And this locust is one you can see on the balconies of the new .
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Science Museum Sep 14
Replying to @NHM_London @bednarz
Obviously we won't use this DDT Insect Spray (on display in our new Mathematics Gallery) so instead....
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Science Museum Sep 14
Replying to @NHM_London @bednarz
... we'll fight them off with this Giant Killer, a British-made insect swatter from 1900-1930
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 14
Replying to @sciencemuseum @bednarz
You're going to need a bigger swatter. Victorians had to shoot some insects like the Goliath beetle out of the sky
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Science Museum Sep 14
Replying to @NHM_London @bednarz
Ah, you mean something like this 1860s London-made Enfield carbine rifle?
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 14
Replying to @sciencemuseum @bednarz
We'd see that coming from a mile off (Bold eagle by Klaus Nigge; one of the 100 photos in our upcoming exhib )
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 14
Time for us to try something stealthy, like this puma-leopard hybrid from our sister Museum in Hertfordshire,
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Science Museum Sep 14
Ah, but we spotted your leopard from our balloon (Lunardi's second balloon ascending from St. George's Fields, 1785)
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 14
In 1785 you'd be too distracted by our fleas... they are legion (and even have there own twitter feed )
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Science Museum Sep 14
We would have caught the fleas in this Chinese bamboo flea trap (on show in our Making the Modern World gallery)
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NHM_Fleas Sep 14
We have MILLIONS OF FLEAS - that would have to be a massive trap. Drop 🎤
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Science Museum Sep 14
No mic dropping here, we look after our microphones (like this widely used BBC version from the 1940s)
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 14
Replying to @sciencemuseum @bednarz
Reminiscent of a compound eye, but does the sound it captures buzz as much as a fly in your ear? (Formosia solomonicola, a true fly)
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Science Museum Sep 14
Replying to @NHM_London @bednarz
We keep the flies out of our ears with these wonderful Ear trumpets (this one is in our Who Am I gallery?)
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 14
Replying to @sciencemuseum @bednarz
When it comes to trumpets (and other sounds), those of the elephant can cover a range of over 200 square kilometres
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Science Museum Sep 14
Replying to @NHM_London @bednarz
Impressive, but have you seen the Rugby Tuning Coil, used to send radio messages to Mars & submarines nearer home
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 14
Replying to @sciencemuseum @bednarz
When the whales were driven to extinction in Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, the absence of their song was heard across the universe...
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 14
Replying to @sciencemuseum @bednarz
Thankfully, the largest animal ever to have existed on Earth has recovered from a few 100 to ~20,000 giving us Hope
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Science Museum Sep 14
Replying to @NHM_London @bednarz
So true & doesn't Hope look stunning! It's thanks to GPS satellites like this that we can monitor movement of Whales
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 14
Replying to @sciencemuseum @bednarz
While satellites look on from above, our scientists use tech to study what lies beneath the
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 14
Replying to @sciencemuseum @bednarz
We've enjoyed our dance with our lovely neighbours next door. We leave you w/ Swim gym by Laurent Ballesta from ...Until the next time
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Science Museum Sep 14
Replying to @NHM_London @bednarz
Until next time indeed! We've had a ball (just like this London Midland & Scottish Railway Company poster)
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Boonarz O'Connell 👻 Sep 14
Can't believe this silliness has now made both the and the . I'm glad the war is over though :)
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Science Museum Sep 14
Us too. Thanks for starting this whole thing. It's been fun but we're glad we're friends again with
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NaturalHistoryMuseum Sep 14
'Over...' [End credits start rolling to Game of Thrones outro music]
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