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Hassan Hassan
Iraq’s PM is fuming. He says Suleimani arrived in Iraq to deliver a response to the Iraqis from Iran about a Saudi offer to de-escalate. They was supposed to meet. Explains why the Iraqi government’s statement was the strongest, even compared to those of clerics Sistani & Sadr
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
Regardless of facts, this explosive detail will be understood in many circles in the Middle East as the Saudis played a role in the killing of Qassem Suleimani, a payback to the Iranian attack on the Saudi oil facilities in September. Saudi Crown Prince called the Iraqi PM today
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
(Because the Saudi pursue of talks with Iran would be seen as a trap to kill Suleimani, if the tweet wasn’t clear)
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
Significant — the Iraqi prime minister says that Washington informed the Iraqi government that Israel not the US was responsible for the attacks on the the Hashd al-Shaabi (PMUs) in the last year.
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
People reporting that the Iraqi parliament voting to end the US presence in Iraq, relax. That’s not what’s happening. Details to follow.
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
The Iraqi PM Adel Abdel Mahdi says that Iraqis won’t be able to protect international troops in Iraq from potential attacks, and the US won’t be able to do either. He says Iraqi has no US troops between 2011 & 2014, without that affecting the strong relationship with the US.
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
The Iraqi parliament voted to “ask” the Iraqi government to end the security agreement with the US, end the presence of foreign troops & the international coalition’s mandate against ISIS, even in Iraqi air space “for whatever reason.” Passing the buck to the gov. Not binding.
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
Sadr issues a statement saying the partial end proposal was weak anyway, with demands: • close the US embassy • end security deal immediately • close US bases in a humiliating way • protection of Iraq should be handed to the Resistance militias • boycott of US products
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
Notorious cleric Sadr also calls for an emergency meeting of all Resistance militias across the region (read: Iran’s proxies) to form “the International Resistance Legions” (He has decided what the meeting will produce, and under what name)
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
We should take these statements as everyone trying to one-up the other. The demands are not realistic. The US will literally not be able to accept them. Bigger than Iraq, especially the parts about ending the mandate against ISIS and the use of Iraqi air space etc. Crazy talk.
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hushamalhashimi
Important clarification from for media. The parliament voted on a decision to end ’s membership in the international coalition to combat ISIS, nothing in the proposal about the expulsion of foreign forces or about the 2008 agreement with the US.
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
Yes the Kurds and Sunnis were absent
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
More on what just happened in the Iraqi parliament
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
Here is the bottom line, folks. Iraqi parliament in a non-biding decision requests for the government to: • cancel assistance of the US-led anti-ISIS coalition • expel foreign troops • state monopoly of arms • file a complaint about the US • investigate US bombings
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
Hizbollah’s Hassan Nasrallah, in his usual calm tone, vows that the United States will be expelled from Iraq.
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
Again, Iran isn’t really saying they’re terminating the nuclear deal. Amazing how news circulates and commentary flows for hours or days, only to be based on a misreading of the original news. Iraq parliament isn’t terminating the security agreement with the US — not yet.
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
Iran is abandoning the nuclear deal *limits*, not the deal itself:
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
A reference to paramilitary groups with weapons (pro-Iran militias) but those are now nominally part of the government.
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
Freudian slip? Hizbollah’s Hassan Nasrallah says that militias backed by Iran will not leave a single Iraqi soldier [then corrects himself to] American soldier in Iraq. His original wording is what these militias try to do anyway, to completely take over.
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
Check this, about the Iraqi parliament’s “decision” to “ask” the Iraqi government to seek the ending of foreign presence in the country
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
Here is the content of today’s decision, poorly reported in most media
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
In the same context — the decision is unrealistic
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Hassan Hassan Jan 5
Replying to @hxhassan
Moves that sounded strong but not: • Iraqi parliament‘s non-biding decision to urge the government to end US presence. • Iran won’t abide by nuclear deal “limitations” but “the steps could be reversed if Washington lifted its sanctions on Tehran.”
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