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Hjörtur J.
Hjörtur J. Guðmundsson. Speaker, writer and commentator. Historian and MA in International Relations (European and defense studies). Free-market conservative.
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Hjörtur J. 24h
US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo visited Iceland on Friday where he expressed his government's desire to strengthen the cooperation with Iceland in fields such as trade and security. Here with Iceland's Foreign Minister .
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Hjörtur J. Feb 16
Well, mainly because you already tried that for decades and during that time the EU was much more successful in wrecking Britain.
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Hjörtur J. Feb 4
Great show last night in Reykjavík, thanks! You probably know that originally Icelanders are of both Nordic and Celtic roots with the Celts coming mainly from Ireland. Which is why we Icelanders tend to refer to both the Norwegians and the Irish as our cousins :)
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Hjörtur J. Jan 30
Replying to @piris_jc
Well, you can certainly say that Brussels' position has been clear and stable. After all the EU has not really offered any concessions in the Brexit talks while constantly demanding more concessions from the British government.
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Hjörtur J. Jan 29
Despite the non-legally binding amendment accepted tonight in the House of Commons opposing a Brexit without a deal the law remains that Britain will leave the European Union on 29 March with or without a deal.
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Hjörtur J. Jan 28
Replying to @GeorgeTrefgarne
Well, EFTA still is as before favoured by many eurosceptics in Britain, but EFTA is of course not the EEA (the so-called Norway option).
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Hjörtur J. Jan 23
While the government of Spain wants to take over Gibraltar it has no intention of giving in to demands by Morocco and ceding control over Melilla and Ceuta to the Moroccan government.
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Hjörtur J. Jan 17
While Britain may leave the European Union without an actual withdrawal agreement there will be, apart from the WTO rules, many other arrangements in place to guarantee basic British interests and those of EU countries and others. Some of which have already been concluded.
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Hjörtur J. Jan 16
The British parliament has already passed laws saying that Britain will leave the European Union without a special withdrawal agreement if one has not been concluded before March 29. In other words, the parliament has already agreed to the possibility of leaving on WTO terms.
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Hjörtur J. Jan 16
Well, correct me if I'm wrong but as I remember it the markets also expected the British people to vote to remain in the European Union in 2016.
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Hjörtur J. Jan 16
Well, in a democracy the majority rules. That is why we have elections. And that is why the Labour Party doesn't have 40% of the seats in the British government and that is why 44.7% of Scotland is not independent today.
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Hjörtur J. Jan 16
Replying to @DanielJHannan
Well, don't forget that this would e.g. also mean that Britain would remain in the jurisdiction of the ECJ through the EFTA Court and all British FTAs in the future would have to take full notice of the EU legislation which the EEA Agreement would require Britain to follow.
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Hjörtur J. Jan 16
Well, disregarding all the serious flaws of the EFTA/EEA option (which my home country has 25 years of experience from) the EU insists that in Britain's case this would require a customs union because of NI which is entirely incompatible with being in a free trade club like EFTA.
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Hjörtur J. Jan 16
Replying to @GeorgeTrefgarne
Well, first of all it will require government action. But even if that was not necessary the majority of the parliament then must come up with some other way they agree on and so far they haven't.
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Hjörtur J. Jan 9
That pretty much says it all.
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Hjörtur J. Jan 3
Well, there are those who would also say that article 50 isn't either worth the paper it's written on as Brussels seems determined to prevent Brexit. Those who wrote article 50 have after all said it was designed never to be used and largely for show.
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Hjörtur J. Jan 3
This was indeed the case in all three Soviet constitutions (1918, 1936 and 1977).
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Hjörtur J. Jan 3
Replying to @piris_jc
Well, the reality is far from being that simple. Before the Lisbon Treaty there was no such exit clause. Was the EU then a federation before the treaty? There was a unilateral exit clause in all three Soviet constitutions. Was the Soviet Union then an international organization?
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Hjörtur J. Dec 24
That the claim, that leaving the EU means leaving the EEA, isn't a lie. These agreements only confirm that. They are after all considered necessary for that very reason. They don't mean Britain will remain in the EEA but only that certain core obligations and rights are mirrored.
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Hjörtur J. Dec 24
Pretty much the reality.
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