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Hjörtur J.
Hjörtur J. Guðmundsson. Speaker, writer and commentator. Historian and MA in International Relations (European and defense studies). Free-market conservative.
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Hjörtur J. Dec 6
Replying to @GeorgeTrefgarne
Asking? Thought you were insisting (incorrectly of course) that Britain will automatically remain in the EEA after leaving the EU?
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Hjörtur J. Dec 1
Well, will Britain otherwise go to the "back of the queue"?
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Hjörtur J. Dec 1
True, and that says a lot about their proposed agreement and their own believe in it. They obviously know it's a bad deal and find it difficult to say anything positive about it. So they resort to trying to spread fear.
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Hjörtur J. Nov 30
Why Britain should avoid the so-called Norway option, the EEA through EFTA.
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Hjörtur J. Nov 29
Those in Europe who are opposed to importing American beef, chickens, etc. What do they eat when they travel to the US? Have they not had burgers there, steaks, KFC and so on? Like on hotels and restaurants?
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Hjörtur J. Nov 28
Replying to @DorsetMike @piris_jc
People in countries such as Canada, Australia and New Zealand are doing just fine as far as I know.
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Hjörtur J. Nov 28
Replying to @piris_jc
Go to WTO now, focus on FTAs with the rest of the world, mainly those who unlike the EU are not in a comparative decline. This will mean Britain's trade with the EU will decrease even more and increase with the rest of the world. If Brussels wants a deal they can ask for it.
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Hjörtur J. Nov 28
Well she hired him again.
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Hjörtur J. Nov 27
Well, not only would that mean Britain not being able to sign up to EFTA's current joint FTAs, which the EFTA Convention requires new members to, and future EFTA joint FTAs. Britain would not be able to sign the EFTA Convention as it is itself an FTA between the EFTA members.
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Hjörtur J. Nov 27
Replying to @GeorgeTrefgarne
Well, even if Britain could remain in the EEA (not true), joining EFTA (which will take time) is not possible until after leaving the EU. Meanwhile WTO rules would apply. Even with a transition, that would require the CU in Brussels' view which is incompatible with joining EFTA.
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Hjörtur J. Nov 27
Well, Britain can either choose a customs union with the European Union or free trade with the United States and the rest of the world.
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Hjörtur J. Nov 26
Precisely. This will mean a bad deal with a comparatively declining market and no deals with the rest of the world where the future markets will be.
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Hjörtur J. Nov 26
Does Britain really want to be shackled within a customs union with a market which is in a constant decline compared with what others are doing?
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Hjörtur J. Nov 26
Replying to @GeorgeTrefgarne
Well, based on opinion polls much more Britons want a World Trade Brexit than the Norway option. So I assume using your very own argument you will not pursue the latter anymore :)
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Hjörtur J. Nov 25
Replying to @GeorgeTrefgarne
Probably because they know better.
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Hjörtur J. Nov 25
The total state debt of Iceland is currently 30% of GDP according to the country's Finance Ministry while the gross debt net of cash and deposits is 23% of GDP.
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Hjörtur J. Nov 24
Well, . First of all, trying to please both sides is not delivering the referendum. Leave did win. Secondly, you can't please everyone and attempting to is usually a recipe for disaster. Thirdly, this deal is obviously not pleasing anyone.
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Hjörtur J. Nov 23
When you claim other options are not on the table in order to get people to accept the one you want it's rather obviously because you know there are better options out there. You simply don't like the competition.
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Hjörtur J. Nov 23
Theresa May has been portraying a no deal scenario (World Trade Brexit) as a disaster saying it's her deal or no deal. However, now she says that no deal is not on the table anymore and it's either her deal or remaining in the EU. After all a no deal has seen growing support.
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Hjörtur J. Nov 23
When you need to sell an agreement using threats that otherwise there will be a catastrophe there really is no need for more evidence that the deal is a terrible one. That simply means you are unable to sell it in a positive way.
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