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Hal Higdon
Lifetime marathoner (111 total), contributing editor Runner's World, & best-selling author. Creator of time-tested, training plans for runners of all levels.
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Hal Higdon retweeted
Marilyn Simmons Bowe 11h
I started running in 1989. I have never had an injury nor been sick! Moreover, I've or more in mileage every year since 2015. Also, I've been a streaker since 01/01/2012. We exist as sensible runners bec/ we are solo runners who stay focused on our running not others!
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Hal Higdon retweeted
Krisha Greene 8h
You can!! I have followed his plans for all of my half marathons and improved from a 2:33 first half marathon to a 1:49 best in my 9th half. I am currently following his Novice 2 full marathon plan for an October race, and my first full. Training is going well so far!
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Hal Higdon 10h
In as few words as possible, you don't beat yourself up so badly that you cannibalize the also important workouts midweek.
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Hal Higdon retweeted
Carolyn Mullen 13h
Contemplating running my next half guided by the program while sitting on the floor at Chicago O’Hare airport during my 3 hour layover for a work trip. I really want the sub 2 hour half...
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Hal Higdon 14h
Possibly. Probably. But we're overthinking the numbers. I usually promote 20 as the Point-Beyond-Which-We-Must-Not-Go. Reaching 20 miles, regardless of time, you pull out your iPhone and call for an Uber.
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Hal Higdon 14h
Running a race at any distance from 5-K to 26.2 never will be easy. If it were easy, the challenge would be gone. Embrace the challenge!
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Hal Higdon 14h
And think of that extra 5-6 miles of fun you missed. Would you want to leave untrod a dozen more miles of pavement that could prepare you properly for Jennifer's Great Big Marathon.?
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Hal Higdon 14h
Ah, we learn. And sometimes it's worth the try to be able to say, "I'll never do that again." Don't trust "so many people."
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Hal Higdon 17h
I phoned my attorney. But--damn--I learned that she was planning to do this R*A*C*E.
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Hal Higdon 17h
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Hal Higdon 17h
Squeezing from 19 to 20 offers a major motivational buzz, much more than (ho hum) going from 20 to 21. Really? Huh? No big deal. And for metric people, 30 provides their Big Buzz number. Get that far and you can count down to 42.2 in small steps.
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Hal Higdon retweeted
AD 19h
Replying to @higdonmarathon
You really don't need to do a 22 miler, unless it's a personal achievement you're after, I did a 22 and 24 for my first marathon training last year and come marathon day my legs were shot but I did get my medal 🥉 lol
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Hal Higdon 19h
A great ability to shift pace from fast to slow to fast again. We don't need fancy shoes; a Magic Camera will do.
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Hal Higdon retweeted
HIGH5 23h
Enjoy Anne :)
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Hal Higdon 19h
Chicago is a long way off. Unless it is a Serious Injury that turns you from a runner into a limper, couldn't you lower your goal 30-60 minutes so that you can enjoy the race as a fun runner?
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Hal Higdon 19h
22 Miles? OMG! That's Forbidden Territory for those following one of my training plans. Unless you know what you're doing. BEWARE: People who have run recent marathons say that the recent WALL at 20 has broken glass & barbed wire atop it. Then snakes that will trip you beyond.
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Hal Higdon retweeted
Raizza F. Videña Aug 18
I admire runners who are able to go the distance on the treadmill.
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Hal Higdon retweeted
David Aug 18
Registered for the , which will coincide well with my marathon training! I’ve used ’s plans to successfully run 10Ks, 15Ks, 10 milers and halfs. Looking forward to my first go at his Marathon plan!
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Hal Higdon retweeted
SR Aug 19
Replying to @higdonmarathon
Reading this post makes me feel so much better. During my last few marathons I've had small sections where I've had to walk and it has killed my confidence. But reading this post will help
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Hal Higdon 22h
Overtraining is not an injury, per se. It is just that when you run, your legs feel dead most of the time. By overdoing it, you may be predisposing yourself to injury. If you overtrain, something bad will happen: not can happen, will happen. Be cautious when you up mileage.
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