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Glenn F. Henriksen
So, in Norway the gov made a Covid tracker app. Wouldn't open the source code, saying open source was a security risk, especially given the short dev time. In less than a week, ppl have decompiled it, published how it works, found sec faults and made GH repos. That went well...
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Bradd Libby Apr 19
Replying to @henriksen
I was writing something and autocorrect just changed my misspelling of ‘Norwegian’ to ‘Orwellian’ and now I think I should not change it back
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Glenn F. Henriksen Apr 19
Replying to @bradd_libby
Is that an "Orwellian slip"?
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Tom Loosemore Apr 20
Replying to @henriksen
got links to the GH repos?
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Glenn F. Henriksen Apr 20
Replying to @tomskitomski
Here and down for some. Or just search for "Smittestopp" on GitHub
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Johannes Brodwall Apr 19
Replying to @henriksen @hallny
... and gotten faults published in the national news! (Hat tip to )
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Thomas Steen Apr 19
Noe som ekspertgruppen advarte mot...
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Sirar Salih 🎃 Apr 19
Replying to @henriksen
Haha, it's ironic. Would've been better if it was open to begin with, that way at least there would've been better monitoring and coordination of suggested improvements to the code.
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Glenn F. Henriksen Apr 19
Replying to @sirarsalih
Yeah, and then you had some people saying "Nobody is going to care enough to find security faults in open source code. All that will do is give Bad People an advantage." I guess people cared... 😐
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Oren Eini Apr 19
Replying to @henriksen @hyc_symas
In Israel, they did the same, but open source, explicitly asked for external security reviews.
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Glenn F. Henriksen Apr 19
Replying to @ayende @hyc_symas
A better approach IMHO.
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