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Heba Aly
Crises | Journalism | Aid policy. Director of . 2018 Young Global Leader. Watch my :
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Heba Aly 10h
Replying to @RTrigwell @stucampo
This was a Chatham House rules discussion, but I think the idea is gaining some steam.
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Heba Aly 10h
Replying to @stucampo
Yes absolutely. And calls for a set of common standards for the ethical use of AI within the humanitrian sector.
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Heba Aly 10h
. in : “Right now, we’re all digital sheep. When you use facial recognition on your phone, you don’t own your face. In the future, there will be a data revolution against these data monarchs.”
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Heba Aly 11h
Replying to @DanielGilman3
There are definitely UN agencies already piloting the use of AI. Is that what you’re questioning?
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Heba Aly retweeted
David Beasley 13h
Replying to @HebaJournalist @UN
Yes!! I feel very strongly about this. The UN needs to learn to talk straight, or else we'll never be able to get people to rally together for a better world.
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Heba Aly 14h
.'s advice for raising more funding to fight hunger and help those affected by conflict? Stop talking jargon. "When I hear the talking with all these acronyms, I don’t even know what they’re talking about." - David Beasley
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Heba Aly 15h
Amid strong anti-Saudi sentiment post-Kashoggi murder, in , praises “remarkable turn-about” in Saudi-led coalition blockade in Yemen. (In an intv w/ , Saudi Arabia’s Ambassador to Yemen calls it all a “misunderstanding”.)
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Heba Aly 17h
Indeed, a new report by also tries to map out the opportunity space in new financing tools for humanitarian response:
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Heba Aly 19h
Replying to @HebaJournalist
Some of the barriers I'm hearing from investors at for engaging in fragile states: -Lack of metrics / understanding of the context -Can’t do things at a sufficient scale early on to justify the effort -Reputational risks: high likelihood of "no-win" situation
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Heba Aly 19h
Replying to @HebaJournalist
All this talk of innovating financing for humanitarian response is meant to bring in new $ for long-term crises. To genuinely do that, investors would have to go beyond financing bonds. Seems little appetite so far to invest in fragile states without guranteed returns
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Heba Aly 19h
Replying to @HebaJournalist
My read-out: Investors say they're ready to put in upfront cash for such bonds. Trouble is finding outcome funders - the same foundations & governments who have already near maxed out their humanitarian aid budgets (though could tap into their development budgets).
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Heba Aly 19h
Replying to @NimaYaghmaei
Absolutely true for current systems too. AI just takes those risks to a whole new level.
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Heba Aly 19h
Replying to @JensLaerke
To hear them becoming mainstream in circles like is new, I think, yes.
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Heba Aly 19h
Replying to @IKEAFoundation
At a breakfast I moderated in this morning, pledged 6.8 million euros to a new impact bond for refugee livelihoods in Jordan (conditional on others joining in for a total of at least $20M)
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Heba Aly 19h
Humanitarian narratives I’m hearing at in so far: 1. Fragile states must be the international community’s focus 2. Climate change is exarcerbating fragility 3. Refugee crises need long-term approaches, including private secor investment
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Heba Aly retweeted
Kristalina Georgieva Jan 22
So what I meant was as follows. Development takes time, patience and perseverance. Even more so in fragile contexts where results are so tough to get. It is nothing like serving instant coffee.
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Heba Aly retweeted
ODI 21h
There are challenges of scale for big ticket investors but we must get the ball rolling, attract new outcome funders & accelerate practical action - draws our roundtable on to a close
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Heba Aly 19h
Replying to @NimaYaghmaei
For ex, it's being used to predict where famine may take place / where people may migrate; to analyze satellite images of damaged areas. A couple risks: What happens when the data behind the AI falls into the wrong hands? Who will be accountable for poor decisions made by AI?
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Heba Aly Jan 22
Really fascinating discussion at Davos w/ humanitarians & technologists about ethics of using artificial intelligence in humanitarian response. Fascinating in that no one seems to have any idea how to mitigate (very serious) risks, and yet are already rolling out the tech.
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Heba Aly Jan 22
“Development in fragile contexts is not instant coffee.” of the on staying the course
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