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HAYABUSA2@JAXA
The official twitter of the JAXA Hayabusa2 asteroid explorer.
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA 14m
We interviewed our mission manager, Makoto Yoshikawa, about how he felt when he discovered he’d been chosen as one of Nature’s 10; ten people who mattered in science in 2018!
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA 3h
Material from the press conference on January 8th is now online. Topics discussed were the results from the solar conjunction operation, status of the plans for touchdown and place names on Ryugu’s surface.
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA 3h
Replying to @haya2e_jaxa
This is preparation for where the spacecraft must move quickly after separating the SCI. The test was a success. [2/2]
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA 3h
In addition to touchdown, we are considering the deployment of the small carry-on impactor (SCI). In today’s operation (January 16), we tested using the thrusters for about 10 second in 4 directions: +X, -X, +Z, -Z. [1/2]
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA Jan 10
Replying to @haya2e_jaxa
This recalculated orbit was used after returning from solar conjunction to resume the home position at an altitude of 20km above the asteroid surface. We were able to confirm that using this new orbit allows us to more stably maintain the home position. 2019.1.7 H.T. [2/2]
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA Jan 10
★ Hayabusa2 status (2019.1.1 - 6) ★ () Our first Hayabusa2 operation of the year was carried out on 1/4. Based on observational data collected during the solar conjunction, we had recalculated the orbit of Ryugu. [1/2]
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA Jan 9
The names for topographic features on Ryugu’s surface have been decided. The theme is “Names that appear in stories for children”, in keeping with Ryugu. On the map, yellow indicates an official name recognised by the International Astronomical Union while orange is a nickname.
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA Jan 9
We are a little late to tweet, but operations in 2019 have already begun. The year, it is the first touchdown. Currently, touchdown is scheduled for the week of February 18th. Thank you for your continued support this year! (Hayabusa2 Project)
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA Jan 3
Replying to @haya2e_jaxa
The beginning of the New Year is a holiday in Japan, but full-scale operations will begin with adjustments for the 2019 touchdown operation. 2019.1.3 T.O. [4/4] These weekly updates can be found online here:
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA Jan 3
Replying to @haya2e_jaxa
The distance to the asteroid could be measured once again with LIDAR and we returned to normal operations without any problems. [3/4]
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA Jan 3
Replying to @haya2e_jaxa
Although this situation was similar to when we approached the asteroid in June, it was a tense time as there was no room for mistakes. However, the spacecraft was able to return to its orbit exactly as planned. New Year’s Eve (31st Dec) was the last operation of the year. [2/4]
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA Jan 3
★ Hayabusa2 status (2018.12.24 - 31) ★ This week, Hayabusa2 returned perfectly from solar conjunction to hover back at the home position at 20km from the asteroid. [1/4]
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA Dec 31
The operations for Hayabusa2 today (Dec 31) have ended on schedule. This completes our operations in 2018! One year ago, we were facing the year when the very unexpected appearance of Ryugu would be revealed. Thank you to everyone for your support & have a wonderful New Year.
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA Dec 28
Replying to @haya2e_jaxa
This photo commemorates the end of the solar conjunction operation! There was a final operation report from Stefania, in charge of solar conjunction orbital planning and the result? Buon anno! But of course, the spacecraft operation will continue through the year.
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA Dec 28
Today (Dec 29) the solar conjunction operation ended! In today's orbit control HPR (Home Position Recovery), thruster injection of ~14cm/s was performed & we returned to the home position at an altitude of ~20km. From here, the 2nd half of the "Ryugu proximity operation" begins!
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA Dec 28
Replying to @haya2e_jaxa
Although the communication environment is returning to normal operation, the return to the home position (at 20km from the asteroid) is still a little way away. 2018.12.26 Y.Y. [4/4] These weekly updates can be found online here:
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA Dec 28
Replying to @haya2e_jaxa
This week, we accessed the recorded data for the first time in a long while and we are relieved to confirm that Hayabusa2 has been functioning normally during the period when telemetry could not be received. [3/4]
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA Dec 28
Replying to @haya2e_jaxa
Telemetry can now also be clearly received, transmitting a detailed account about the state of the spacecraft. Data collected while communication with Hayabusa2 was not possible was saved to onboard memory. [2/4]
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA Dec 28
★ Hayabusa2 status (2018.12.17) ★ This week is the second half of the solar conjunction operation. Signals from the beacon operation are becoming cleaner every day and it is possible to differentiate between “0” and “1” without overlapping the signal multiple times. [1/4]
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HAYABUSA2@JAXA Dec 24
We captured this image of Ryugu with the Optical Navigation Camera - Telescopic (ONC-T) during the solar conjunction operation. This was taken on December 11, around 21:00 JST. The distance to Ryugu was about 110 km and the data was transmitted from the spacecraft on December 21.
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