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Henry Cook Jul 12
Gouldian Finch male. Can't help the messy perch, I was wandering around looking for birds and he just flew up in front of me!
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Biodiversity and Conservation Science 9h
Numbats, woylies and quokkas, oh my! DBCA scientists just wrapped up a 2 yr camera trapping program in the southern Jarrah forest. They collected 1.6 million photos of 🦘 25 mammal 🦜 28 bird and 🦎 4 reptile sp to enhance knowledge of our unique fauna.
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RohanClarke Jul 7
Tiwi Masked Found only on the Tiwi islands NT and reliant on a healthy native mammal population.
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Christine Cooper Jul 14
I was delighted to photograph some stunning regent bowerbirds in
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Bronwen Scott 4h
Varied sittella in one of its variations, near Kununurra, WA.
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Stephen Mahony 5h
Replying to @SVMahony
Blindsnakes eat ants, ant eggs, larvae and termites! They have adapted smooth shiny scales to prevent damaging ant bites when raiding nests. The thickest Blindsnake species are often that way because they target bigger ants with wide jaws! 📷Anilios ligatus
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David Parker Jul 7
Another rainy night in Griffith and this Giant Banjo Frog has the biggest grin.
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Upswept 17m
One of my favourite ✔️s in Oz! RT Little known fact—there is a small population of feral ostriches in Australia. Yep. Come for the endemics; stay for the mixed bag of ferals!
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Tim Henderson 13h
Where did he go? Cameratraps reveal animal den use at our monitoring site.
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‏Ewen Bell Jul 6
Last week while putting about Mt Borradaile we chanced upon a Broad-billed Flycatcher and he was so charming although he never really sat still and did make it hard to photograph from a moving boat in cloudy light amongst the paperbarks.
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Stephen Mahony 5h
Replying to @SVMahony
Blindsnakes are not particularly dangerous except when you google image search the Australian genus “Anilios” at work….. resulting in porn rather than delightful burrowing snakes. I hope I’ve given you reason to love Blindsnakes! 📷Anilios nigrescens
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Kerry Vickers 4h
Sooty Oystercatcher at Yambuk recently
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Gordon Smith 9h
Apparently it's World Snake Day (I wonder if there's a double-choc, choc-chip muffin day?). So, here are a few pics I've taken over the years. The Copperhead was in Cathedral Rocks NP, but I don't recall where the other two were offhand.
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Geek Street Jul 11
Not a twig. It’s a giant stick insect! 🤗
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Paula Peeters Jul 13
Some recent bird observations... Is this bird listening, or looking, or both?
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Michael L 1h
Apparently it's ! Here's a red-bellied black snake I got a little too close to at Mangalore a couple of years back.
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A/Prof Euan Ritchie 3h
How good are...green pythons? 📸 Iron Range
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Stephen Mahony 5h
Replying to @SVMahony
Blindsnakes include the largest genus of Australian Snakes with the genus Anilios containing 46 species! As well as Ramphotyphlops and Indotyphlops being represented by one member each. Other genera are found around the world. 📷Anilios bicolor
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Eucalypt Australia Jul 14
A scaly-breasted family tucks into a feast of Desmond’s mallee Eucalyptus desmondensis! With their brush-shaped tongues, lorikeets are important pollinators of many .
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Michael L Jul 13
Some more Darwin highlights: forest kingfisher, pied heron, yellow-bellied flycatcher and rainbow bee-eater
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