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Michelle Kittleson Apr 19
: glean a nonmedical fact from every patient. From a 70M, I learned that he met his wife at the age of 5 and married her at 18. Just one new fact and, a patient with a disease becomes a person.
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Katie Murphy Apr 22
I always ask patients 'Is there something I didn't ask you that you think I should know?' at the end of the history. Gives great info and also tells you what the patient is worried about.
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Mitochondrial Eve Apr 16
Just once I would like to read a that explains what a work ethic ISN’T. It ISN’T - eliminating everything from your life but Medicine - missing your Nana’s funeral because of work - working every holiday - knowing all the answers - never asking for help
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Sacharitha Bowers Apr 17
Replying to @BrowofJustice
Yes. Work ethic IS: Putting ur emotional, mental, physical health 1st SO U CAN take care of pts, colleagues, staff, trainees. It’s asking for help, not being afraid 2B afraid, or of failure. It IS knowing u are NOT alone & that we can’t do this w/o each other
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Gavin Preston, M.D. 3h
You think your second year resident is the font of all medical knowledge? One on-call night my throat was killing me. I found my older, wiser 2nd yr & told him. He looked & said "You're such a wimp. It's just a virus." Me: "Humor me & check." Later: Him: "Strep."
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Ross Morton Apr 17
Replying to @PicardTips
from Do not ignore this valuable lesson.
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Armand Krikorian, MD Apr 23
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Emily Schwartz Apr 16
always ask the patient about if they have specific concerns that bring them in to the ED today. So many times cancer hasn’t been on my ddx but patient is very concerned and they leave much happier after we’ve talked that through.
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Gavin Preston, M.D. Apr 22
"When a says 'Don't you want to...' YES. YOU DO. When a nurse says 'Are you sure you want to...' NO. YOU DON'T."-- Amy Fan, MD.
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Gavin Preston, M.D. Apr 17
It's OK to not know. It's always OK to ask. But if you lie to ANYONE on your team, there is no surer way to kill patients, and to get yourself fired. I saw it multiple as a resident. Our entire residency training system depends on honesty and integrity.
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Gavin Preston, M.D. Apr 17
"No one knows as much as a medical student on their last day of med school; but no one knows as little as an intern on their first day."-- My Chief at start of my internship.
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Liam Farrell 7h
To paraphrase , 'There is, in the misfortune of other doctors, something not entirely unpleasant.' Farrell, Dr Liam. Are You the F**king Doctor? Tales from the bleeding edge of medicine. Kindle Edition.
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Subha Airan-Javia, MD FAMIA Apr 17
Replying to @pgyfun @NoobieMatt
That’s a great one! I also do that as an inpatient-asking patients what their goals are for the admission. That way we are on the same page about expectations & can work towards a common goal
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Kyle Johnson Apr 20
A cool thing happened at work so I wrote about it. it’s definitely worth it. Also need be a real life thing
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onthewards.org 20h
What are the common pitfalls make when submitting their CV? How can they be avoided? Medical field is becoming more competitive. Listen to on how to do yourself justice on your CV
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Gavin Preston, M.D. Apr 16
When I started internship, & began working 80 hours/week, I saved time by stopping shaving & storing my contact lenses. Bought some "professor" glasses. Grew a long beard. I was age 26, one benefit was all comments about "you look too young"--Gone!
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Anita Thomas MD MPH Apr 15
and question: what are online free resources you use for residency? Asking for a group of impending interns
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Marty Muntz Apr 16
Replying to @mmteacherdoc
Twitter- advice given on - 655 unique tweets in 2 days - mostly from junior & senior docs (10% non-physicians) - discussions on IPE, organization, prioritizing sick patients, dealing w new responsibilities - how to acclimate
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Michelle Kittleson Apr 22
: Before you order a test, know your plan for a normal, abnormal, or indeterminate result. If this thought experiment demonstrates that the test won’t change your management, or if you don’t know how to interpret/act upon all possible results, don’t order the test.
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Shreya P. Trivedi MD Apr 16
Am not an ED doc so take w/ grain of salt (1) Organization skills - developing & honing a system (maybe more tru on floors but had 1 in the ED too) (2) Asks 4 and receptive to in real-time feedback (3) Says IDK to things he or she doesnt know cc:
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