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Sharmila Dissanaike Jul 3
Secret to surgery: go fast in the fast parts, and slow in the slow parts. The point of training is to learn which is which. Operating slowly by itself is not a virtue, since this increases anesthesia time for the patient which isn’t ideal.
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Meghan Lark Jul 12
Three things I learned during my first week of surgery sub-I: surgery is the coolest (duh), 2 hour cases can easily turn into 8 hours cases (so don’t skip out on snacks beforehand), and abdominal anatomy is AWESOME
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Mambacita 🐍 Jul 5
Post call! 24hr neuro-obs NEEDED!!! πŸ§ πŸ©ΈπŸ’‰ πŸ’šπŸ’™
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Tom Jul 5
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Deepak Sharma Jul 4
Time to rethink the perioperative use of gabapentinoids! No clinically meaningful difference in acute, subacute, or chronic in meta-analysis of 281 RCTs. Also adverse events like dizziness & visual disturbance.
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Neurosurgical Atlas Jul 1
Surgeon is the captain of the ship. The master captain navigates the ship to the shore under the most turbulent conditions. Surgical intelligence, technical greatness, patience, and appropriate temperament define the best of us!
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Past Medical History Jul 4
The surgical instruments used for trephining by Nicolas Henri Jacob from 'TraitΓ© complet de l'anatomie de l'homme' by Marc Jean Bourgery, 1831.
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Lesley Barron Jul 3
I'm a general surgeon. I have a family with 3 kids. It's great actually. It could have been easier with better policies (which I'll still keep advocating for) but it's completely doable. Stop saying this stuff to female trainees.
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Priyanka V. Chugh, MD, MS Jul 3
If you were/are an applicant using social media as part of your process for deciding what residency programs to apply to, what things are you looking for? What would you like to know about programs?
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Diana Shiba, MD Jun 30
πŸ‘ Amazing privilege to do what we do for the eyes...
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Nova-Nice Jul 4
I am thinking about to do more tours to other cities. Where do you want me to come to? Β 
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StoriaDellaMedicina Jul 12
, in 2008, Michael E. DeBakey died at the age of 99. 's surgical innovations included coronary bypass operations, carotid endarterectomy, artificial and ventricular assist devices.
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Dr.Gianluigi Bisleri Jul 5
An interesting case of a very large left (5.5 x 4.5 cm) which we recently treated via a approach (images with pt permission). Patient discharged home on POD#3 !
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Charlotte Holbrook Jul 3
Great to see this month’s RCS Bulletin focusing on sustainability in surgery
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Anne Stull Jul 9
30K is a very tall order, but I have to try. Please help me get a new mattress!
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π™ˆπ™€π™£π™©π™šβ€™π™¨ π˜Ύπ™§π™šπ™’π™š π™ˆπ™–π™’π™žπ™ž . πŸ’†πŸ½β€β™€οΈ Jul 9
κ§π™Έπš–πšŠπšπš’πš—πšŠπš›πš’ π™±πš˜πš’πšπš›πš’πšŽπš—πšκ§‚ i want to get my body done prank on Monte 😩😝 5RTs, 15 likes, 9 comments
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Global Children's NCDs Jul 4
Check out this feature on by Dr. Naomi Wright! Have a read to learn more about our study and how you can get involved!
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MarshmallowFiresideKeith (❀️@PregKeithZineπŸ–€) Jul 1
Day 7- Drains Out Zzzzzz Nap Time 😴 πŸ’€
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Omar M Ghanem Jul 1
πŸ—£πŸ—£ Today, Dr. will serve as the David L Nahrwold PROFESSOR of Surgery at Penn State University. A well deserved to a leader in the & field.. and yes, he is 41!!!!! Congrats my dear friend πŸŽ‰πŸŽ‰
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Ali A. Baaj MD Jul 12
The patient on the left had a small lumbar herniated disc. The one on the right had a large one. Which one needed surgery? Neither...both improved with short course of physical therapy and medications. Treat the patient, not the X-Ray.
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