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Eric Beckman Jul 15
Welcome to tonight's on decolonizing the curriculum! Your hosts tonight are and . Please introduce yourself, where/what you teach and what brings you to the discussion.
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Chris Hitchcock 🌏🌍📚 Jul 15
A2) I think there are issues with images that are used in textbooks & supplemental material, I think with some good intent, to show how horribly people were treated by others. However, this also perpetuates the view of people in colonized areas as victims without agency.
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Chris Lewis, PhD Jul 8
A1: Here are some great tips for building anti-bias classroom communities from
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Angela A. Lee Jul 15
A5: Biggest challenge - getting my colleagues to get on board. It's a risk to move away from how it's always been done
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Angela A. Lee Jul 15
A2: I think some of the main narratives can be shaken up a little bit. On this year, we've had some good discussions on Age of Revolutions and centering the main narrative to the Haitian Rev rather than AmRev or French Rev.
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Eric Beckman Jul 15
Q1 What does decolonizing the curriculum mean to you? In your content area how might it differ from adding diversity?
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Maine Teacher 20h
And now for some lakeside planning. It’s where I do my best work. Chilling with my buddy and listening to the dog snouting around.
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Chris Lewis, PhD Jul 8
A7: This is a great book with voices from teachers implementing history lessons.
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penny kittle Jul 10
“When students own their voices and tell their stories, they become not only stronger and more confident writers, but also stronger and more confident individuals.”
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Mary-Owen Holmes, EdS Jul 8
Join us next week as hosts and lead us in a discussion on "Decolonizing the Curriculum!" June 15. 7 EST/6 CST
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Angela A. Lee Jul 15
A5: Including the students in the dialogue that historians are having and debating, creates more engaged learners. It becomes a thinking habit, not just something to memorize
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Andrew Swan Jul 8
This could be an excellent essential question that ties together a whole year's curriculum!
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Eric Beckman Jul 15
Q6 How do we encourage students to continue thinking and acting to disrupt normed notions of colonization?
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Nate Kogan Jul 15
A2 – The "Teaching Hard History" padcast has some great suggestions about how to make non-white resistance central in the narratives of the Civil War:
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Keisha Rembert Jul 15
A3: I wish we questioned the idea that teaching this subject is especially not a political act. It most certainly is. Social studies is the formation of civic engagement and its teaching therefore must be political.
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Joanne Fuchs Jul 15
A1 This topic is challenging. In my 7th grade world history class, it means sharing the stories of all walks of life, not just those in power.
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Chris Hitchcock 🌏🌍📚 Jul 8
A5) History is the story of people from the past. LGBTQ people have been a part of history, even if they haven't been discussed much in the past "official" histories. When we know better, we do better.
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Keisha Rembert Jul 15
A4: Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States is a great resource. I loved Teaching Tolerance’s Teaching Hard History. NPR podcasts. Revisionist History. I often start by centering the voices of the underrepresented. We proceed from their point of view.
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Kevin Hennessey Jul 14
Planning for my students to create podcasts in my 8th grade social studies class next year. Any advice, success stories, or horror stories?
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rholdegraver Jul 15
We study ancient civilization and really don't discuss a colonial view. # edu5213sbu
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