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Science Magazine Jun 13
The discovery of a new species of toxin-producing helps explain how a poisonous and its algal prey obtain their chemical defenses. Read more in Science: ($)
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Mr. New Vegas 9h
my new sea slug guy named scuff (Based off of post)
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Vanessa Knutson Dec 1
Adorable bubble snail from Bali, a / relative that never lost its shell. As it moves, it produces a LOT of mucus. And yes, those are it's eyes :)
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Török Júlia Jan 9
in stole - Cratena pregrina's self-defense weapons, kleptocnidae come from hydrozoan prey. Unfired nematocysts pass through the gut protected by chitinous layer and mucus. Cnidophage cells of the gut diverticula engulf them and store at the tip of cerata. N-Adriatic Sea
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Kate Vylet Feb 14
A love bite! The rainbow (Dendronotus iris) feeds on tube-dwelling anemones (Pachycerianthus fimbriatus) with a sneak attack! The is only interested in a mouthful of tentacles, but the anemone sure doesn't appreciate being spaghetti dinner.
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Ashley C. Smart Dec 1
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KM Williams Jan 9
Blue Dragon - these sea slugs drift on the ocean surface, carried by winds and currents 🌊 They eat bluebottles, other pelagic creatures, and sometimes each other! 😮 They also drift upside down! The blue patterned side is the "foot" 👣
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Oceans Beauties Apr 24
God Gifted Crown Ocean Creature: Tambja morosa Facts: Tambja morosa, also known as Tambja kushimotoensis or Gloomy Nudibranch, is a species of sea slug.
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Scribbletoad 🐸 Jun 3
Continuing this little series of sea critters with some sea bunnies today. Who would have thought slugs could be this adorable?
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Mohamed Adel May 5
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Kate Vylet Jan 21
A flaming dragon in form, the (Flabellinopsis iodinea) is easily one of California's most dazzling . Incredibly, all three of its vivid colors - purple, orange, and red - are derived from the same pigment and acquired from the hydroid it eats.
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Lunsel @ Otaku Madrid Jun 10
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Alison Young May 8
Cute little spotty Triopha maculata at Pillar Point. Fun fact: we've found this species of every single survey we've done there over 8 years except one! Our most consistent and long-term nudibranch friend. 😍
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Harvey Cairns Jan 27
Nudibranchs of Hawaii, July ‘18
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Darrin Schultz Jun 12
Last week at FHL we found a swimming (Dendrotus iris?). This usually crawls on substrate eating tubeworms and hydroids but we caught it swimming near the surface. I've only ever seen Plocamopherus swimming before.
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Ixudyn™ May 10
Thousands of eggs in egg ribbon coil laid by sea slug/nudibranch.. This is the biggest egg ribbon I've ever saw.. size of a rice bowl.. The sea slug can't be found nearby so difficult to identify.. . Dive site: USS Liberty Wreck, Tulamben, Bali.
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Amanda Betancourt-Szymanowska Jun 1
NUDIBRANCHS ENGAGE IN SOMETHING CALLED PENIS FENCING. THE WINNER STABS THE LOSER AND THE LOSER GETS IMPREGNATED. HAHAHA TAG YOURE IT, HAVE FUN WITH THE KIDS. NO THE WINNER DOES NOT PAY CHILD SUPPORT OR ATTEND BASEBALL GAMES.
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Alison Young May 24
I usually have to travel these days to find a new-to-me , so I was extra happy to meet this little Smooth-tooth Aeolis (Apata pricei) for the first time this morning along the Coast!
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Sussex Wildlife Trust 🦋 Mar 24
Sea slugs are amazing looking creatures! They look like they should live in the tropics, but this one was filmed in a rock pool near & is only 5mm in length. Visit ' blog for more spectacular photos:
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Scribbletoad 🐸 Jun 2
Made another sea critter. This time some nudibranch, the blue dragon. Would love to do some more of these, because there is such a big variety in color and shapes.
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