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Kory Evans PhD May 30
Just another flatfish (E. grandisquama) showing a complete disregard for the vertebrate body plan. Look at those eyes and that twisted skull. (First pic cred: Katayama et al., 2012).
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Quite Interesting Sep 30
This is what the skeleton of a hammerhead shark looks like. (Image courtesy the project / .)
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Dr. Matt Kolmann 11 Apr 18
The fearsome mug(s) of Pygocentrus nattereri, the red-bellied piranha. Note the tooth rows that are ready to be replaced, the bone is already eroding beneath the active teeth & some teeth have already fallen out!
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Kayla C. Hall Aug 17
Hi all, if you or anyone you know have small myliobatid specimens (DW <300mm) and would like them please contact me or give them my info! Data will be used in thesis, as well as uploaded to for public use! Please RT!!!
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Kory Evans PhD Oct 14
Here is another cool parrot fish that we scanned last week. I cant get enough of these beaks. These are easily the coolest beaked vertebrates on the planet, right along with beaked whales.
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Kory Evans PhD Aug 15
If you were a piece of coral (and had eyes) this might be the last thing that you ever see. Rainbow parrotfish (Scarus guacamaia) showing off a formidable beak
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Kelsi Rutledge May 23
No big deal just CT-scanning some dead fish.
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Jonathan Huie Dec 9
This is Elacatinus tenox. Only 7 of them ever collected and not much is known about it. I bet he's a voracious carnivore, but everything's relative when you're only 3 cm long.
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Dr. Matt Kolmann Jul 18
Still my favorite scale-eating fish of them all (piranhas at least), Catoprion mento - the wimple piranha.
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Matt Friedman 19 Mar 18
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Dr. Matt Kolmann Dec 8
My first avian-fish scan. A hummingbird, Archilochus I believe... didn't fare too well vs. the walls of a colleague's house.
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Claudio Quezada-R Sep 17
Really excited to from !! Aplochiton, Trichomycterus, Diplomystes and more about to come!
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Sven Laming Sep 11
Class idea to create a micro-CT database for fish. Nice to see some other micro CT work
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Mackenzie Gerringer Sep 10
At tomorrow- come to San Carlos at 17:00 to hear about the feeding ecology of abyssal and hadal fishes! A taste of the CT scans you'll see: Synaphobranchus kaupii, a eel. That premaxillary ethmoid complex!
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Abigail von Hagel Sep 11
The division between abyssal and hadal fish communities may be due to feeding ecology. compared data from baited cameras, stomach contents, and micro-CT scans.
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Thaddaeus Buser Jul 7
Just wrapped up my 100th official fish burrito! 💯🎉
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Abigail von Hagel 23 Sep 17
Check out these jaws! Hoplias malabaricus or "wolf fish"
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Jules Chabain 12 Oct 17
I love scanning rays, they're always smiling.
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Diego F B Vaz Jun 7
Finishing the intermuscular manuscript, I processed the scan of the paratype of Colletteichthys flavipinnis, endemic from Oman and known only by a few specimens! We now know the shape of their skeleton!!!
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Dustin Siegel 8 Feb 18
Imagine how much easier Dave Sever's life would have been with a CT scanner... the cloacal glands really come out nice.
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