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Katie Budrow Sep 18
A5 To start, keep that formative work out of the gradebook. Students won’t have the pressure of the grade or score to hamper risk-taking.
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Garnet Hillman Sep 18
Replying to @ItsAMrY
Yep - it doesn't matter that you failed or had a setback. What matters is how you respond moving forward.
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Jenny Rinehart Sep 18
First time joining the chat...8th grade ELA teacher in Iowa. Fully transitioning to SBL this year.
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Matt Townsley Sep 18
A1) I’d say the purpose of grades is to **communicate** students’ current levels of learning in relation to the course/grade-level standards.
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Adam Dyche Sep 18
A5: I prefer “struggle” over “failure” because it’s far less binary (eg can or can’t; did or didn’t) and reinforces the process over the outcome. Too often, for Ss, “failure” is perceived as an autopsy versus a check-up, and become deter in their journey.
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Jon Szychlinski M.Ed. Sep 18
Hello SBL crew! Jon Szychlinski checking in from North Berwyn SD 98. I hope everyone had a great summer!
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Katie Budrow Sep 18
A6 Also, organize the gradebook by standard, not by assignment/task.
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Kirk Humphreys Sep 18
Replying to @dmourlam @mctownsley
I was one of those Tchrs who struggled to give up grading homework. I was ready to die on the fact my kids wouldn't do it if it wasn't graded. Here I am now after 5 years not having collected/graded a single piece of formative work. I am no longer a prisoner of homework.
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Garnet Hillman Sep 18
Replying to @AggieSalterITS
Welcome back Aggie!
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Adam Yankay Sep 18
Pairing SEL with SBL may also be a great way to get traction with SBL. Since moving to SBL years ago, I've found that my Ss appreciate the peace that a patient approach to learning takes.
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David Buck Sep 18
A1: Interesting how grades reflect the learning philosophy of the person using them. They can be used in meaningful ways but can also do more harm than good.
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Jon Szychlinski M.Ed. Sep 18
A4: When talking to S's and P's I explain SBL in this way. Mastering standards are where we want to go. Some of us ride a bike, plane or rocket. Each journey is unique and about the learner! Don't worry about struggle or failure. That is part of learning!
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Johanna Br⌬wn Sep 18
Anybody else think back to their school experience and wonder what would’ve happened if they were in an classroom???
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Kristen Koppers, NBCT Sep 18
A2: hard to answer because there are so many factors
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Adam Yankay Sep 18
So much of is supported by the book "Make It Stick." I've referenced and presented on that book for a few years now. It's a GREAT resource for influencing educators and parents towards sbl practices.
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Lee Ann Jung Sep 21
📍Students' grades should represent their current location, not an average over time. Where they were isn't important—only where they are right now.
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Dave Wheeler Sep 18
The "intended" purpose should be feedback for the student relative to what being taught. The "reality" is that we use grades too often to rank and sort our students.
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Rik Rowe Sep 18
Kindly and share something new you'd like to incorporate this week.
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Kirk Humphreys Sep 18
A2: Anything that counts as practice (formative work) should never be included in a grade. Warm-up exercises during practice never count in a basketball game; therefore, practicing concepts should never count prior to an assessment.
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Adam Yankay Sep 18
The power of putting grades in pencil is profound. Let students see you erase an old grade and replace it with one that reflects re-assessment, growth, and learning. Pencil, not pen. Sand, not stone.
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