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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 10
The Dictionary of the Inscriptions is here! The book documents the lexicon of the pre-Islamic Arabic speakers of the Harrah east of the Hawrān as attested in a corpus of some 30,000 Safaitic texts. So what’s inside?
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Sep 17
Do you want to get an idea of 100s of years before Sibawayh? Read ! 4 those who can't join me in class, I share this teaching document with a selection of Safaitic texts, fully glossed, normalized, and translated.
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Nov 11
What's on the cover of the dictionary? This is a photograph I took during the 2017 season of fieldwork. The nearest stone contains 3 beautifully carved texts. These have been documented but not yet published. I'll edit my favorite of them here, a text by an "orphan"!
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LoS Project 3 Feb 16
Translation of the inscriptions in the photo we just tweeted, courtesy of
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Sock Puppet 23 Jun 18
RT : is ditching the Central Limit. A problem
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 8 Oct 18
Romans going native! The nomads east of the Ḥawrān used the expression ḏī ʾāl to express affiliation with social groups. CEDS 322 (pic) is by a man named Bayyān son of Taym of the lineage of Titus! <ḏ ʾl Tts>. That's right, a nomadic Arabian tribe called Titus!
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Aug 18
Replying to @Safaitic
And of course the name is found in (and Hismaic and Dadanitic). (Mafraq 85) :Translation By Ġayyār son of ʿabdallāh and he grieved for his uncle, etc..., struck down by Fate., so O Lt may those who remain (alive) be secure.
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Edges of History 8 Mar 17
Most people see graffiti as modern day vandalism... who knew it really had ancient roots as shown in Fisher 1.8
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Thread Reader App Jul 31
Replying to @twadak @Safaitic
Hi! there is your unroll: Thread by : "&lt;Thread&gt; Allāh is the word for ‘God’ in Arabic. But where did this word come from? Muslim scholars have several vi […]" Have a good day. 🤖
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Ahmad Al-Jallad Aug 28
I am finishing up an article on a new inscription discovered this summer containing the month name ʾadar (February-March) and its significance for the phonology of 'Arabian' Aramaic. As you can see, the Safaitic spelling ʾdr does not spirantize the /d/...
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Brill MidEast Africa Aug 27
'A Dictionary of the Safaitic Inscriptions' comprises more than 1400 lemmata and 1500 lexical items. The dictionary includes a lengthy introduction to the inscriptions as well an outline of various aspects of the writing tradition.
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Sock Puppet Feb 18
RT : I will be both evil and the electorate doesn’t like parrots without imposing yo…
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LoS Project 17 Dec 15
Replying to @BradshawFND
Thank you! Our aim is for a better understanding of the desert nomads through the beautiful and
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Surazeus 26 May 18
Across the sun-blistered volcanic fields of Al-Safa in the Harrat Ash-Shamah ten thousand stones glow with letters of words.
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LoS Project 3 Feb 16
Black Desert camel riders! A beautiful example of the and inscriptions from our research area
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AEN 15 Aug 17
A new batch of exciting articles will appear next month. For now, a new blog entry on Fate in Safaitic:
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Ahmad Al-Jallad 30 Sep 18
dictionary edit updates. At the N's, and this text it worth tweeting: Author of MAHB 2 states: wagada ʾaṯra ʾaśyāʿ-oh fa-naganna 'he found the traces of his companions and went mad (from grief)'. naganna <ngn> is the equivalent of inžann...
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AEN 5 Oct 16
Corrected readings/translations of Safaitic inscriptions in online exhibition;
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AEN 21 May 15
NEW ARTICLE: pre-Islamic Arabic in Greek letters:
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Sami Abugharbieh May 31
Audio recording of the British Institute in Amman public lecture by Michael Macdonald (Oxford University), "Tweets from the Desert: social networking among Jordan's ancient nomads", Amman, 28th April 2015. .
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