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Andy Park 4h
Tonight on we look at how growth is effecting our cities.
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Matthew Toohey Oct 15
Replying to @DrDemography
Yeah, it's scary comments like that that explain why they probably didn't interview you for this story, Liz. 😉 
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Jessica 4h
The report on has me wanting to play Sim City. (The original PC game from 1998!!)
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Badger Mash 3h
Replying to @harteltibor
Almost all our most serious problems come back to . And still our politicians change the subject whenever it's mentioned.
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Sally K Franco Oct 14
tonight. Australia’s population growth. I remember writing a paper at uni in 2001 about how water availability will restrict population growth. The govt is crippled by the incessant view of increasing GDP and populations. Starting to see the affects of this.
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Pierre R 2h
Talk about insisting on the difficult solution to the problem!
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abc730 5h
Tonight we continue our three-part special on . Last night looked at suburbs, tonight we focus on cities and how they will cope with our explosive growth.
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Badger Mash 3h
Replying to @harteltibor
Economists are particularly guilty on this score. So much of what they term economic growth is simply down to growth.
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Sustainable Pop Aus Oct 14
covering this week
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Kirsty Kelly 11h
Congratulations to on release of it’s latest policy manifesto on &
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Ignoble Jim Houghton Oct 15
It's dog-whistle evening on . Keep your ears out for the adjectives being used. And if you drag in Dick Smith you're being very clear where you're going.
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Kay Designer 🎨 18h
How Fun. I have a degree, and also studied with NASA + NOAA! is just a political term, for what was once called "Population Explosion" dur 1970s. It was changed to "Climate Change" to be acceptable to Governments, not willing to limit growth.
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The American Geographical Society Oct 14
"From 2000-2010 the population of the central United States declined. A combination of a higher death rate than birth rate and outward migration led to a fall in the population of counties running down the nation’s midsection."
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Andy Park Oct 14
Tonight, my 3-part series on our growth begins on - I dropped into with to talk about the series
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abc730 Oct 13
How big should Australia's be? Tomorrow starts a special 3-part look at population. With the population forecast to reach 40 million by the middle of the century, we look at the pros and cons of big Australia.
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TeslaStein 2h
When You Saturate & Ruin Statistics with Divisions Of Racism & Sexism & False for Evil Sadism & Masochism to Evil? Making Think Our is Mostly Minorities & LGBTQs? Ya Ruin & Education & Healing & & !
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Richard Ashwell Oct 8
Replying to @RichardLAshwell
Have just done a search on this document and the nine mentions of the word are in the context of the impact of 1.5C on various parts of the world population. There is not even an acknowledgement of the impact of rapidly increasing population on .
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Angie 20m
In china people started having high rates for divorce and failed marriages which leads to not having the desire to have babies. Which this goes with pro-natal policy trying to encourage to have babies for prosperity for the population.
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Martin Tye Oct 14
Replying to @nomutedwords @ABC
You are correct- largely due to the fact that people are living longer. But what is it that terrifies so many about stabilising our anyway? I just don't get it. Surely the thought of ever increasing numbers on the world's driest inhabited continent is far worse?
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dai davies Oct 9
Replying to @DaiDavies_
is too high anyway...Thin it out a bit??
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