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MSUIBIO Dec 3
We cannot live without . But can these single-celled organisms readily adapt to increasing ocean temperatures? Findings from a new study suggest that phytoplankton species can be in danger from global change.
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Johan Viljoen Dec 3
Attending the Masterclass today & tomorrow hosted by CREST! Excited to learn more about how to better communicate my research! .
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University of California-UNFCCC Dec 4
Scripps’ : Sudden ice shelf collapses led to blooms as a lid of ice is removed and sunlight reaches water underneath. “There will be winners and losers even in terms of species” because of melt.
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🐬Dolphin Angels🐋 🌏🌱Ⓥ Dec 7
Nations use saving fish stocks as excuse for killing & . Science says more mean→more →more . When will nations stop killing whales to save fish stocks? BTW 7.6 Billion ppl are the reason fish stocks r depleted N
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TracEx Stellenbosch Dec 8
Replying to @StellenboschUni
The paper investigates the impact of light & trace nutrient (iron) addition on (photosynthetic microorganisms). This is important in view of current & future CO2 drawdown by these microorganisms from the atmosphere into the ocean.
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Dr Ellie Prime Dec 5
"...as if millions of voices suddenly cried out in terror and were suddenly silenced. I fear something terrible has happened." That's what happens when you preserve water samples with Lugols.
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PLOS ONE Dec 10
Replying to @UniLeipzig
Bozzato and colleagues at identified species-specific differences in photosynthetic and respiratory acclimation to temperature and salinity in Antarctic (5/8)
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Dr. April Abbott Dec 4
Replying to @April__Abbott
Every breath you take is at least in large part thanks to a - no blue, no green!
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AlgaeBarn Dec 5
Pick up everyone's favorite combo pack today! 5280 Pods Three Species Copepod Blend and OceanMagik Phytoplankton
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Marine Scotland Dec 6
A fully funded ARIES studentship on nutrients and coastal communities is available. Apply to work with UK and Scottish Coastal Observatory datasets by January 7th 2020
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Kiyoko Yokota 23h
Congrats to Claire Garfield, former BFS intern, Oneonta HS grad, current UG , member and 3-time participant. Claire will conduct MSc research on as a .
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Philippe de Bard Dec 6
are worth more than $1 trillion for their contributions to carbon capture, and the industry. Whales can store huge amounts of CO2 and support the growth of , which stores 40% of all produced.
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Irene Richards Dec 7
1/2 . poop→is food for →Phytoplankton removes & makes >71% of ’s →Less CO2 minimises →Stabilises & . Phytoplankton forms basis of food chain→means more fish
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Abstract artist Dec 4
Our are sick. We have to save them. Will Oxygen in the Ocean Continue to Decline?
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Britt Alexander Dec 6
Congrats for receiving funding from the to continue the legacy to teach Londoners about through creative art!!!
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Michelle Lougee Dec 10
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theblotmagazineposts Dec 9
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Karie Holtermann Dec 8
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KOKOSHUNGSAN Dec 7
90 Capsuleshttps://kokoshungsan.net/groupbuy/2019/12/07/marine-phytoplankton-dietary-natural-health-ethos-supplement-90-capsules/
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SustainabilityX™ Magazine Dec 6
Whales are vital to curb : Whales store huge amounts of & support the growth of , which stores 40% of all produced. A 1% increase in phytoplankton productivity is equivalent to 2B mature .
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