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Bhutan Bird Finder (Birding in Bhutan) Aug 4
The Rufous-chinned Laughingthrush (Garrulax rufogularis) in the cool broadleaved forest.
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Bhutan Bird Finder (Birding in Bhutan) 11h
Spotted the Yellow-vented Flowerpecker (Dicaeum chrysorrheum) while foraging on the fruiting parasitic plant in the subtropical forest.
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Bhutan Bird Finder (Birding in Bhutan) Aug 2
The male Himalayan Cutia (Cutia nipalensis) in the broadleaved forest of Jigme Dorji National Park.
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NAOC | #NAOC2020 17h
At long last, the portal w/ the complete schedule is now available. Attendees can log in, browse talks, events, & presenters, and create their own custom agendas! Desktop & mobile clients available. Details here: |
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Graham Appleton Aug 5
The first Grey Plovers are returning from their Arctic breeding grounds. Where have they been and what conservation challenges do they face, around the globe?
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José F. Rico Silva Aug 6
Our paper on urban bird ecology in Amazonia was published in Urban Ecosystems. :) Erratum: due to an error in the production process, Table 2 (list of bird species) is incomplete. :( 🔗
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Avocetta Aug 6
Take a look at the article of our Editor-in-Chief Roberto Ambrosini on and 💻🐦
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Laurel Mundy Jul 30
Hey folks! Remember my Birding Washington map? I finally made prints—11x14’s now in my shop! Each comes with a bird identification key 🦅 Please RT if you know any Washington birders who might like one ☺️
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Buteo Morph Aug 6
New article in Journal of : Morph-dependent and directional change of frequencies over time in a Dutch population of Common .
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Steve Portugal Aug 5
Our new paper paper is out today in Biology Letters, all about dominance hierarchies in pigeons. We looked at hierarchies over successive years, interactions with body mass, and effects of artificial mass loading
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James Richardson 18h
Playing with word2vec and the ebird bird descriptions for the WH. This shows bird family names that appear in a similar text context. Some unsurprising results here such as petrel and shearwater being close together, and a cluster of raptors.
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Elora R. M. Grahame Aug 2
Nighthawk nestlings are getting bigger, but that doesn’t stop them from snuggling up under mom! I snapped a quick picture of this chick poking its face out when we checked the nest last evening (sibling’s stubby little tail is sticking out on the left).
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BOU 👩🏻‍🏫👨🏿‍🏫🧕🏽👳🏽‍♂️ 🌈 14h
Multimodal mimicry of hosts in a radiation of parasitic finches | Evolution |
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Elora R. M. Grahame 19h
AH YES, it’s that special time of year where we find fledglings and wonder where the heck they’ve been hiding this whole time! This young whippoorwill now has a tag. Maybe we’ll find mom and sibling if we’re lucky! 🤞🏼
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Liam U Taylor Aug 6
Having to prerecord my talk like
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Martins Briedis Jul 31
In our new paper in we combine activity tracking with light‐level geolocation to show that Tawny Pipits migrate mainly at night using numerous short flights and stopovers. Overall flight vs stopover ratio = 1:6.5 Full story here:
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Loberd 4h
Enjoyed photographing Blue (da ba dee) this AM at the lake. I suspect it is an older one but I have no idea why. Blue (da ba dee) got itself a nice little fish too!
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Birds & Binocs 4h
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Graham Appleton Aug 4
DISTURBANCE of is an issue that really worries birdwatchers. This blog about an interesting paper from and colleagues has had 1400 reads in 6 months:
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Graham Appleton 21h
In hot weather, roost in wet places, where they can keep their feet and legs cool. (Research from NW Australia - where have to cope with hot conditions). More about the importance of finding a good place to snooze:
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