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Graham Appleton 4h
First Whimbrel in Iceland today - presumably one of the minority that don't take a refuelling break in Britain & Ireland on way north from Africa. Story revealed using geolocators by & colleagues:
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American Ornithology 1h
It's ! In 1932, Roland Case Ross published a note in The Condor on his attempt to measure the flight speed of White Pelicans by following them in his car.
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RSPB Science 10h
NEW PAPER Use of microsatellite‐based paternity assignment to establish where Corn Crake chicks are at risk from mechanized mowing
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BOU 6h
Changes in trophic state and aquatic communities in high Arctic ponds in response to increasing goose populations | Freshwater Biology |
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Azan Khan 2h
How fragile they're that their own reflections sometimes kill them without any mercy.. Found window strike case for the first time here.
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American Ornithology 3h
Why submit your paper to The Auk or The Condor? Speedy turnaround times, free abstract translation, promotion on the AOS blog & social media, plus extra benefits if you're an AOS member!
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Thomas MondainMonval 4h
First common sandpipers back to the study site yesterday. Both colour ringed individuals from my first year and were the first to come back last year too! Consistent apparently. Still keep a lookout please!
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Dan Baldassarre 23h
In lab my students had to learn to visually ID (family and common name) 194 NY Birds and learn 79 vocalizations. For the lab practical, I'm thinking of asking them to ID 20 photos, 20 skins, and 20 vocalizations. Too easy? Too harsh?
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BOU 8h
We are exploring setting up Special Interest Groups (SIGs) to encourage communication & collaboration within our community. Please help us by completing our short questionnaire (max. 5 mins). Please RT! Thank you
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Jamie Ross 8m
A beautiful Redshank (Tringa totanus)
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Dr. Lauren Gillespie 🏳️‍🌈 5h
twitter I am stumbling around eBird like a loon trying to walk on land. 😕I just want to find migration maps of barn and cliff swallows to see how close they are to Nebraska! Help!
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James Spencer 22h
Do you even Brown & Shepherd?
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Sarah 10h
One of the things bouncing around our brains at the SBOT Science & Research sub-committee, & elsewhere. Early days but a promising start to something fascinating! 'Project Yellow-browed'
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David DarrellLambert 13h
A foggy morning surveying
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Graham Appleton 12h
As the last Green Sandpipers leave the UK, here's a reminder of the struggles they face to survive a British winter. Blog from 3 months ago.
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juliet vickery Apr 17
Includes a paper documenting the recovery of endemic Henderson Crake to pre-eradication levels following anticipated mortality during an unsuccessful rodent eradication. Something aided by a captive population held in situ during the eradication
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Hautbois 7h
Replying to @Clericue
Ours are noisy at the moment as well. Baton passed to them by the blue tits who were being lairy a few weeks ago.
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juliet vickery 7h
next opportunity for Ecologists in Africa Grant from is July and provides support of up to £8,000 for ecologists in Africa to carry out innovative ecological research
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NHM Oology Apr 17
The Challenger Expedition 1872-1876 is famous for laying the foundations of modern oceanography - during their 81,000 mile global journey they catalogued thousands of new species and collected ornithological specimens like this Variable Hawk from the Falkland Islands
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UofMemphisBiology Apr 16
It's field season for the Bowers Lab, so that means early mornings, nest box checks, capturing birds with mist nets, and measuring individuals for data analysis.
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