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Dragonfl'AI Jun 18
All the team is hard at work on making a thing of the past!
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Dr. Ify Aniebo Jun 17
The WHO identified 21 countries with the potential to achieve zero indigenous cases of by 2020. It would be useful for Nigeria to learn what Botswana, South Africa and Swaziland are doing.
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Microbes&Infection Jun 14
A Ugandan inventor has won a major prize for a device which tests for without drawing blood. The device detects changes in the color, shape and concentration of red blood cells - all of which are affected by malaria.
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World Health Organization (WHO) Jun 11
Great news! WHO certifies malaria-free. 🇵🇾 is the first country in the Americas to eliminate since Cuba in 1973.
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Music Against Malaria Jun 19
Malaria is preventable and treatable and still people lose their lives everyday. Share and spread the world of and let’s do our bit to help! 🌍💊
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Africa.com Jun 16
Brian Gitta from wins Africa prize for bloodless test. 👏🏾👏🏾
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World Health Organization (WHO) Jun 11
Replying to @DrTedros
“Success stories like ’s show what is possible. If can be eliminated in one country, it can be eliminated in all countries.”—
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ArtemiFlow Jun 18
Plants are in the ground! Together with , we're going to be making the world leader in production. Every day we're closer to ensuring is a worry of the past with a lot of cheap, available medicine. ,
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Wai-Hong Tham Jun 18
Excited to be here with Bruce Russell and learning about the amazing cynomolgi culture that is going to explode research!
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Fatimah Maitambari Jun 18
The only advantage to is your likelihood of dying from is reduced significantly. Otherwise, you feel ten times worse before you recover; bloating, cramps, nausea, diarrhea and everything else in the GI section.😭😓😞
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World Health Organization (WHO) Jun 11
Replying to @WHO
Despite progress, the global fight against is at a crossroads. WHO is working with countries and partners to scale up efforts to achieve malaria elimination within the next few years.
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World Health Organization (WHO) Jun 11
Replying to @WHO
In 2016, WHO identified 21 countries with the potential to achieve zero indigenous cases of by 2020. has now achieved malaria-free status. Here is an update on the progress and challenges from other countries:
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Dragonfl'AI Jun 17
Dragonfl'AI aims to use and to deliver near real-time maps of mosquito larvae locations to accurately destroy them near habitats. In the long term we wish to help eradicate Help us make this project a reality
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@who · @malariacongress
Kevin Blanchard Jun 16
This is amazing. New, bloodless test for could be a game changer in the fight against the disease (it's low cost, reusable & requires no technical expertise) -
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The Global Fund Jun 16
Ugandan inventor Brian Gitta has developed game-changing new test for , using beams of light instead of drawing blood. He’s named his invention “Matibabu” meaning “treatment” in .
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Pedro Alonso 19h
One way we’re fighting against ? Well, one mosquito at a time! We documented local efforts in India, Kenya, DRC, Paraguay, Myanmar and Cambodia. Have a look at the photo story here:
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Microbes&Infection Jun 16
bloodless test by Uganda engineer wins Africa engineering prize. Matibabu (Swahili for ‘treatment’) is low cost, reusable and because the procedure is non-invasive, does not require specialist training.
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Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus Jun 11
It gives me great pleasure to certify that is officially free of . Such success stories show what’s possible, & give us hope that malaria elimination is possible in all countries. Muchas felicidades Paraguay Estoy muy orgulloso de ustedes
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Elena Gómez-Díaz Jun 17
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Wai-Hong Tham 24h
Kia ora! Lovely day for a talk at Microbiology and Immunology. All departments signs in Maori. With Bruce Russell and his scientific extraordinaire Noi :).
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