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Dr Andrew Wooff 8 Nov 18
We've developed 5 key Law Enforcement Public Health research priorities from our project - vulnerability, better partnership working, info/data sharing, Org. wellbeing, MH crisis. Great work by Ini Enang,
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Peter Kim 23 Oct 18
About to speak at an international policing conference (@LEPH2018) in Toronto on how police actions are undermining health initiatives. I'm not going to be very popular But I'm pretty sure my PPT presentation will be the best. It has embedded video!
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Journal of CSWB 20 Oct 18
ICYMI: The Journal released Vol 3(2) on Thursday just in time for @LEPH2018 delegates arriving in Toronto. The Journal is now the official open access & peer-reviewed voice of the and movement .. our call for papers continues. Help us keep the theme alive. RT?
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Alex Workman 3 Jul 18
Excited to be presenting my research at #2018 @LEPH2018 in the awesome Toronto. Both nervous and excited to be accepted for this amazing chance to present my findings to help benefit the advancement of LGBTIQ peoples. Shout out to my amazing supervisor for all she does šŸ’Æ
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NES Psychology Oct 23
The opportunity to share the work of and and the National Trauma Training Plan at is really appreciated. What an extraordinary event!
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Scot Gov Health & Justice Collaboration Oct 1
conference is fast approaching! Get yourself signed up to these satellite events taking place on 18th and 19th October.
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Journal of CSWB 12 Oct 18
Again we thank & acknowledge our growing community of authors & reviewers. Our open call for papers continues. Whether a veteran researcher or never-before published we encourage your contributions to the growing & body of knowledge. Visit
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Dr Andrew Wooff Oct 21
Replying to @JenM_Research @scleph
And here's the diagram is highlighting as the key priorities for
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Nadine Dougall 8 Nov 18
Some of our policing & public health work, along with epidemiology & literature reviews. Laying the groundwork for evidence based work Presented at @LEPH2018
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Journal of CSWB 25 Oct 18
Congrats to the @LEPH2018 organizers, speakers, panelists & delegates on a successful event & significant steps fwd for & . Look fwd to featuring many papers over the coming months & beyond. In much divisive times, inspiring to see such global efforts to collaborate
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SCLEPH Nov 6
Delighted to be keeping the momentum going after . Fantastic meeting with So many committed, talented change agents in one room with so many ideas that 2 hours became 4 hours!
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Saket Priyadarshi Oct 21
Replying to @saket_sanju
2/2 Key seems to be role of ā€œNavigatorsā€ described as below- non police staff employed to support offenders wrt underlying probs (mental health, alcohol and drug problems) are key. Note relationships and trust at top, psychologically informed service
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Miriam Krinsky Oct 21
1/2: Honored to discuss the role of prosecutors in advancing & other public health strategies worldwide at conference . Together, we can change the narrative on drug use & work to reverse the harms inflicted by punitive criminal justice systems.
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Dr Katrina Sanders Feb 12
conference 2018 best Iā€™ve ever attended! Hope 2b 2 present great work continue 2 do in health & wellbeing
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LEPH2019 Oct 21
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OrlandoHM Nov 7
The collective leadership approach is a brilliant way of working together with people in complex systems, and "making the invisible visible". We can't just do more of the same and expect different outcomes - we have to work differently.
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Leanne Savigar Oct 23
The 'Road Safety' panel now in full swing...
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iMraNā„¢īš˜ Jun 10
I must post my Eid photos.
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Hamish MacLean Oct 23
Really looking forward to presenting my work supporting young people in Polmont at today
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Saket Priyadarshi Oct 21
heroin use, homelessness, 50+ offences. Then someone in Durham police asked him root causes- Child sexual abuse, more trauma in later life- and built a therapeutic relationship. Now-illicit drug free, treatment and wider supports. Powerful case studies from Checkpoint.
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