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Italian with Susanna 13h
Questo/a= this Questi/e= these In , they can be abbreviated into: 'Sto/'Sta 'Sti/'Ste The apostrophe is key in spelling, to avoid ambiguity with some forms of the verb "stare". The short is allowed only when they are adjectives, NOT pronouns.
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Italy Magazine Nov 29
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Italian with Susanna Dec 5
"Chi la fa l'aspetti" (= literally, who does it, shall expect it) is an saying. It could be translated with the English "what goes around comes around", although there is more of a revenge connotation to it.
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Italian with Susanna Nov 29
The verb "riuscire" means both "to succeed" and "to be able to". The related noun is "riuscita" (= outcome). "Buona riuscita"= success. "Cattiva riuscita"= bad outcome. "Esito" is its synonym. "Buon esito" = success. "Cattivo esito"= bad outcome.
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Italian with Susanna Nov 29
Thanks Erika, this is a perfect example of how many connections there are between , despite superficial differences. I hope this will encourage you all to abandon any possible hesitation to . By the way, in we also say "conseguire il/un successo".
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Italian with Susanna Nov 28
Successo= success Insuccesso/Fallimento= failure Di successo= successful Fallimentare/Fallito= unsuccessful Un successo= a hit/a successful film, event, etc. "Fallito" is also a name for someone who's perceived as a complete failure in life.
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Italian with Susanna Nov 30
Abito= Dress/Piece of clothing Abitudine= Habit Abitare= To Inhabit Abituare= To Accustom Abituarsi= To Get Used To Abituale= Habitual Abituato= Accustomed Abitante= Inhabitant I can grasp the semantic logic behind this apparent chaos. Can you as well?
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Italian with Susanna Dec 4
"Chi di spada ferisce, di spada perisce" (= those who attack with a sword, will be killed by a sword) is an saying. It suggests that evil doers are likely to subject themselves to a backlash/revenge, even more extreme than their initial offense.
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Italian with Susanna Nov 29
You're welcome, Amin. If I were to answer you in , I could say: Prego (= you're welcome) Non c'è di che (= there's nothing to thank me for) Di nulla/niente (= literally, of nothing, like the French "de rien") Figurati (= go figure) Dovere (= my duty)
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Italian with Susanna Dec 6
The word "veleno" and the English "venom" both come from "venenum", the Latin term for poison. 🐍 Some experts say it has a correlation to the goddess Venus, since its alleged original meaning was that of a love potion.
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Turin Epicurean Dec 5
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OptiLingo 10h
Italians tend to be very dismissive of their own government and the rules it creates to govern their lives.
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Notes from Verona Dec 6
Replying to @rick_hough
Another common mistake I make: "Sono sempre in corso" instead of "Sono sempre di corsa" (I'm always in a hurry)
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Italian with Susanna Nov 29
The word "successo" derives from the Latin/ verb "succedere", which means "to happen". Indeed, we are having success when we make a desired outcome happen. The verb "to succeed" is usually translated with "riuscire" or with the phrase "avere successo".
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Italian with Susanna Dec 5
Divine : Dio (plur. Dei)= God Dea (plur. Dee)= Goddess Divinità= Deity Eroe= Demigod The internationally used term "diva" is of Italian origin, and it literally means female deity. In we also use the masculine "divo", referred to a male cinema star.
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My Italian Circle Dec 3
Languages? The more the better! 🇮🇹🇷🇺🇨🇳🇬🇧 Lesson 5 of our Beginner course is now available on our YouTube Channel. Have a look and leave us a comment! 🙂
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Italy Magazine Dec 6
Feeling ill? What to Say in Italian When You're Sick
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Just Speak Italian Dec 1
👩‍🏫 Always, often, never...: how to express in ? Look at the table and learn these and the rule behind them -
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Daily Italian Words Nov 30
A List of 10 Popular Italian Christmas Songs with Lyrics and Translations in English ⛄🌲🎁🎅
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Serena Dec 5
Creating the micro-habit of learning a little bit every day will help you learn Italian smarter and faster. Our time is precious.
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