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Barry Bradford 13 Jul 18
Discovering King Tutankhamun's tomb: Harry Burton's photographs
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Laura Blair May 9
Today I picked up some glass plate negatives, I believe from around 1910-20. They came from a larger collection by one family, but sadly I couldn’t afford to buy the lot! Does anyone have any ideas where these might have been taken?
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James R. Ryan 26 Jan 18
My article on Robert Hunt, pioneer in early , and popular writing, is now available via in latest edition of :
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NTS Collections Dec 8
Have you been to ? On your next visit, why not recreate this of Ian and Violet Brodie and their friends standing by the entrance? (Dogs optional - but welcome in the grounds!)
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ESJ Mar 6
A reminder that all are welcome to the Domus event on histories of childhood and education in the First World War. Registration here:
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Michelle Henning 27 Oct 18
My new blog post- - suggesting the Rule of Thirds is an expression of bourgeois property relations ... but you knew that already.
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University of California Press 17 Apr 18
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Andrew Hobbs May 22
Any working with local Facebook history/nostalgia groups -- using them as a source, collaborating with them, archiving the material they post?
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NTS Collections Nov 1
It's (almost) time to bound into the ! We hope this photograph of Sandy and Ian Brodie from gives you that . This was taken in March 1909 by Violet Brodie.
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NTS Collections Jan 13
Us: Put the camera away, we're totally not ready. Also us: [This of poser extraordinaire Lord Inverary was collected by Elizabeth Brodie, Duchess of Gordon (1862-1863).]
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Catherine E. Clark 3 Oct 18
In French Photography today I'm teaching Albert Kahn's Archives de la Planète. I'm delighted that a vast portion of this collection is now online with Open Data Hauts-de-Seine.
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NTS Collections Jan 10
The first of 2020 rises tonight! Who's in need of a good old fashioned howl? This photograph was taken on South Uist by Margaret Fay Shaw between 1929-1935.
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University Library Oct 23
New on the Library blog - Part IV of the St Andrews rephotography project which coincides with . This week PhD candidate Édouard de Saint-Ours takes a look at St Andrews Castle:
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bjp1854 19 Aug 18
From rare interviews to technological advancements, British Journal of Photography has been capturing the history of photography since 1854. Take a look through our archives #1854
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Tim Greyhavens 25 Aug 18
The North American Photographic History website welcomes anyone interested in the in Canada, the U.S., Mexico, and Central America. No cost or obligations to join.
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Salts Mill 25 Sep 18
Replying to @SaltsMill
The results are now on the walls of gallery 2 -we love the magical, touching qualities of this image. Here’s a timelapse of it going up:
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Elias Kreyenbuehl May 7
What a beautiful and passionate journey through the ! Prof. Dr. Peter Fornaro in his inaugural lecture
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Anna Wilson Nov 26
So many great submissions for the Cyanotype Assignment. Hope the students had as much fun as I did with this...
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Eleanor Goodman 15 Oct 18
My favorite part of the publishing process: when the advances come in. Tanya Sheehan’s STUDY in BLACK & WHITE just arrived. Made possible in part by
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Emily Hayes 8 May 18
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