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RCSI Feb 17
The story of pioneering Cork surgeon Dr James Barry, who lived as a man to pursue a medical career, will be shared on tonight at 8.30pm.
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A.J. Wright 23m
Today’s Find: 21 Feb 1924 newspaper article about painless childbirth in Paris using diethylamine
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Past Medical History Feb 14
An illustration of the polymath and physician Avicenna, from medieval a manuscript entitled ‘Subtilties of Truth’ c.1271. Avicenna has been described as the father of early modern medicine.
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D Lev 2h
Curious about the political battles around health reform and how history shapes policy? is coming to to talk about her fascinating new research in just a month. Mark your calendars! Big thanks to and others:
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Past Medical History Feb 19
Trepanned Neolithic skull. New bony tissue is present indicating patient survived
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Past Medical History Feb 18
Anatomy of the hand from Johannes Sobotta's atlas of human anatomy, 1st published in 1904
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Past Medical History Feb 13
The famous 'photograph 51' - dubbed by some as the most important photo ever taken. This X-ray diffraction image of crystallized DNA was taken by Rosalind Franklin and Raymond Gosling in 1952 and was critical evidence in identifying the double-helical structure of DNA.
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Louvain Rees 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 5h
It's 🧠 Here is one of the earliest photographs of the nurses at Glamorgan County Lunatic Asylum. The photograph was taken at Parc Gwyllt in the late 1880s. These were some of the first Mental Health nurses in Bridgend.
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Past Medical History Feb 17
Scottish surgeon John Hunter (1728-1793) - one of the most distinguished surgeons of his day and an early advocate of the scientific method
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Amir A. Afkhami 30m
“In the 19th century, body harvesting was a lucrative trade with grave robbers wandering local cemeteries for recent burials. Bodies would be sold for about $20 to local hospitals or medical schools to perform research on them.”
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Louvain Rees 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 4h
Replying to @hellohistoria
A beautiful photograph of a nurse holding the baby of a patient at Glamorgan County Lunatic Asylum. Lovely to see a cat cwtched up at her feet 😍
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StoriaDellaMedicina Feb 13
Dorothy Mabel Reed was a physician specializing in cellular . In 1901, she discovered that Hodgkin's was not a form of tuberculosis, by noticing the presence of a special , the (Reed–Sternberg cell) which bears her name.
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James Stark Feb 19
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Melissa Dickson Feb 17
Our edited volume is out now, with essays on cancer, suicide, and social degeneration as products of stresses of 'new' ways of living, and others on legal, institutional, & intellectual changes that contributed to modern medical practice.
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Anne Garner 4h
These postcards are a great resource for , but also for urban and architecture historians and history of printing enthusiasts. They have over 2K in all.
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RCP museum Feb 14
Arteries in red, Veins in blue, We hope you enjoy This superior view. (Illustration of the human heart in Gray's anatomy, 1905)
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NHS Grampian Archives Feb 20
Distillery accidents, an accident with a gun resulting in the loss of parts of fingers, and a soldier admitted from the police cells for overstaying his leave. It's not just medical information you can get from 's Stephen Hospital records in 1919!
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Louvain Rees 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 21h
There is an old superstition that if scarlet fever or smallpox were epidemic, red flannel worn around the neck, or next to the skin on any part of the body, warded away the disease 🌡
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NYAMHistory Feb 20
We recently rediscovered this beautiful hand-colored heart manikin in our collection!
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Past Medical History Feb 16
Professors Welch, Halsted, Osler and Kelly - the four founding doctors of Johns Hopkins Hospital, each a larger-than-life personality
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