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π•«π• π• π•π• π•˜π•ͺ π™΄πš‘πš™πš•πš˜πš›πšŽπš› Jul 10
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Ben Zino Jul 9
The smallest rattlesnake in the world, the pygmy rattlesnake (Sistrurus miliarius) is one of the coolest reptiles I've ever had the pleasure of seeing in the wild. Check out that coloration and attitude!
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Rin Wolfe Photography Jul 9
Our final skink, for now, another broadhead. I really like how these shots turned out!
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Akilah πŸ¦œπŸ¦‹πŸŒΈ 14h
There are lizards in Queens, NY!!! 🀯 Looking for lizards was so much fun because it was like birding but your eyes stay on the ground. Here is a picture of an Italian wall lizard taken with my phone through binoculars. 🦎
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James Jul 10
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Rin Wolfe Photography Jul 10
Two eastern fence lizards (Sceloporus undulatus) spotted in southern Maryland. We rarely see lizards around our area, so it's neat when we head into their territory.
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Rin Wolfe Photography Jul 9
Another adult five-lined skink (Plestiodon fasciatus), this one on the rail of a fishing dock. This was close to where I'd seen a large rat snake the week before. I'm not sure why the reptiles like this dock, lol.
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Rockjumper Birding 14h
New Blog up! QUARANTINE HERPING by Adam Walleyn. He writes,"...With probably the longest lists of reptiles and amphibians anywhere in the United States, southern California is a renowned herping hotspot."
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Jack Ashby Jul 9
Amazing camouflage - right down to the dark specks of stone - from this pygmy desert monitor lizard (also called a rusty desert monitor). 🦎
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The Green Ogre Jul 7
H is for ! In rainwear & leech socks we boldly go where our grandmothers told us not to go! Peering with hopeful enthusiasm under rocks & in dense vegetation, we seek out snakes, frogs, toads... If winter is for birding, is for herping! Enjoying ?
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Rin Wolfe Photography Jul 11
Our old friend the northern water snake (Nerodia sipedon), this time at the bottom of a precarious wash. Luckily, I didn't scare it away when I fumbled down lol.
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Rin Wolfe Photography Jul 8
An eastern racer (Coluber constrictor). I spotted this snake slithering over a boat ramp and thought I'd lost my shot when it crawled into the grass. However, it was cautiously watching us closeby. Wonderful little snakes.
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Blaine Dillinger Jul 8
Have Guitar 🎸 Will Travel 🧭 (prepping for a gig with in Columbus around 2010) 🦎🦎🦎 …
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KathglzπŸΈπŸ’­ Jul 12
stickers joined the gang :) thanks for making my water bottle look even better!🐍🐸 🌈
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Rin Wolfe Photography Jul 9
The same five-lined skink as before, this time a head-on shot. This little dude was a great model.
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Rin Wolfe Photography Jul 7
An itty bitty painted turtle (Chrysemys picta)! This little turt could have easily fit into the palm of my hand. Always a treat to see baby reptiles.
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Rin Wolfe Photography Jul 5
Another lizard, this time a broad-headed skink (Plestiodon laticeps). These and the five-lines can be difficult to tell apart, especially when young. The adult coloration is helpful though.
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Rin Wolfe Photography Jul 6
A large American bull frog (Lithobates catesbeianus). Their calls fill the marsh during spring and summer.
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Rin Wolfe Photography Jul 6
A painted turtle (Chrysemys picta) found crossing a small causeway between two lakes. Luckily, this area is restricted, so it passed safely. Those big front claws signify this is probably a male!
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Rin Wolfe Photography Jul 4
An adult five-lined skink (Plestiodon fasciatus), one of our six native lizard species in Maryland. These skinks can drop their tails to escape predators, and you can see a partially-regrown tail on this little dude.
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