Twitter | Search | |
Search Refresh
Chris Anselmo Oct 8
A2: (2/2) It's definitely worth organizations working towards building empathy into day-to-day practices. I wrote about one example in my own life. It really can make all the difference, and all it took was a willingness to listen and care.
Reply Retweet Like
HCLDR Moderator Oct 8
Time for T1: How might employing empathy “cost” you anything in relation to the benefits? Examples?
Reply Retweet Like
Rasu Shrestha MD MBA 13h
LOVE this: Babies Who Are Cuddled More Seem to Have Their Genetics Altered For Years Afterwards.
Reply Retweet Like
HCLDR Moderator Oct 8
Time for T4: What value do you place on empathy and personally and/or organizationally? Critical for success or not?
Reply Retweet Like
HCLDR Moderator Oct 8
For next hour we’ll be discussing: “The Value of Empathy in Healthcare” You can read more on the blog
Reply Retweet Like
David Lee Scher, MD 24h
Here’s the real story of rural medicine in the USA, highlighting one hero.
Reply Retweet Like
Rasu Shrestha MD MBA Oct 12
Can't wait for to JUST be called . Like digital songs, movies, bank transactions, purchases, bookings... you know, the rest of life. 🤔
Reply Retweet Like
Pam Ressler Oct 11
Listen to , repeat listen to nurses. We often have more context beyond quantitative data on patient condition
Reply Retweet Like
Brave Bosom Oct 1
How might we legitimize the role of peer support groups in healthcare?
Reply Retweet Like
Sean Erreger, LCSW 3h
Ugh... This is what happens when your argument for policy implementation is not grounded in facts...
Reply Retweet Like
Nathan Grunewald MD Oct 8
T1 There are strategies to manage the emotional risk associated with being empathetic. However, if we are not prepared the toll can be tremendous.
Reply Retweet Like
Ken Gordon Sep 17
T1 George Bernard-Shaw: “All professions are conspiracies against the laity.” The non-clinical perspective brings some much-need balance to the healthcare scene.
Reply Retweet Like
Scott Krugman, MD Oct 1
T4. I personally think that orgs that truly partner with the community are more trustworthy. But the most important constituent in the trust equation is the community itself. They are the ones that matter.
Reply Retweet Like
HCLDR Moderator Oct 1
That’s a wrap. Thank you for joining the tweetchat tonight. Your time, tweets and comments are greatly appreciated!
Reply Retweet Like
Doctors On Social Media Sep 28
If you are a , are you active on Instagram? After participating in the poll, please comment below on whether you find it helpful & ur overall take on the platform/what u use it for.
Reply Retweet Like
Ziva Mann Oct 1
T3: key concept here? share responsibility. Share leadership. Start by learning from people, communities about the challenges and strengths - and what matters most.
Reply Retweet Like
Enlightening Results Oct 3
Thankful for local shops. Thankful for little touches. For anyone who needs this today. ☀️💖
Reply Retweet Like
Tomasz Czarny Sep 24
If you don’t launch an idea, workflow etc. until it’s ‘perfect’, you probably missed out on the opportunity to get feedback from peers, stakeholders, patients, ‘customers’ ... iterating on ‘good enough’ via feedback leads to true perfection not just the perception of it.
Reply Retweet Like
Breanna Lathrop, DNP, MPH, FNP-BC Oct 1
T4 Approach and intent are key here. Trust is working with communities with a focus on listening and building community capacity. Coming in with an outside agenda and assuming understanding doesn’t build trust
Reply Retweet Like
Breanna Lathrop, DNP, MPH, FNP-BC Oct 1
T3 Local communities are already aware of what they need. Rather then us supporting them, we go out, listen first and ask how our knowledge, language and resources can support and expand the work they are doing
Reply Retweet Like