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P J Richards Jun 13
🌘🌊🌖True to the contrary nature of the Fae - who are often found living in springs, rivers and the sea - running water is said to repel them, and crossing a fast-flowing stream will save your life if you are being hunted by them.
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Maude Frome Jun 12
The tragic seal woman of the Faroe Islands, who placed a deadly curse on the men of the village of Mikladalur for killing her seal family. The statue, created by Hans Pauli Olsen, was raised on the Faroe Island of Kalsoy in Aug 2014. Img: visitkalsoyuk
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Lore, Land & Spirit Jun 12
Wishing Wells, it was believed contained a guardian or spirit that would grant folks a wish if they paid a price. That wish would be granted according to how the coin landed. Heads up, granted, tails up, ignored. And so it became lucky to throw coins into a well
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Icy Sedgwick Jun 13
So is all about the sea and water today...here's the inevitable article about selkies! (Also includes an excellent selkie folk song - and image below by me)
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🌼🍋Helencello🍋🌼 Jun 13
If a mermaid fell in love with a sailor, Neptune would banish her to the depths of the sea where she would cry for her lost love. Brokenhearted, her tears were said to turn into seaglass and make their way to shore so that their love would find them
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Genevieve Adeline Jun 13
Around Scottish/Faroe islands a selkie is a seal that can shed its skin and become a human on land. A man stole a selkie's skin and forced her to marry him. She always pined for the sea & the moment she found her skin she ran to the water and never returned.
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Matt Gilbert Jun 13
The sinister uruisg, or water-man, is a large, clumsy & deformed creature that haunts lonely stretches of rivers or waterfalls in parts of Scotland. The uruisg of Glen Maili did chores for farmers, but if angered turned savage & was said to lust after women
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Mark Rees Jun 13
Going sailing? Take a cat! They can be used to predict storms on the high seas: "When cats are frolicsome on board a ship, the Welsh sailors say 'a gale of wind is in their tails, and there is rain in their faces.'" Folklore of , 1909
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Ailish Sinclair Jun 13
The beautiful Bullers o' Buchan in . You can see puffins there sometimes and, according to local legend, mermaids too!
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Archive of History Jun 13
In Inuit mythology the Qalupalik is a humanoid mermaid who likes to to kidnap children playing near the shore using a humming voice to lure them to the edge. Some say she feasts on the young, others say she feeds off their youthful energy to preserve her beauty
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Annette, Vendee Holiday Cottages Jun 13
1840, the French ship Rosalie sailed through the Sargasso Sea & was later found with its sails set but no crew members on board. 19th century lore told of the Sargasso Sea's carnivorous seaweed, which was believed to devour sailors whole, leaving only the ship.
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Adam Pidgeon Jun 13
Medieval bestiaries describe the Aspidochelone: a fish so huge it can be mistaken for an island. When washed up on a remote island you should give the ground a few exploratory stabs & if you hear any angry rumblings immediately take your business elsewhere.
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C a r o l i n e 1h
Siga em anexo My instagraaammmn 😻😻😻
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Maude Frome Jun 12
The weeping willow always grows near water & is sacred to the . It has long been associated with sorrow in love, loss & mourning, but also, due to its flexible nature, with the flow of feelings & emotions, leading to grief being healed. Img: Cicely Barker
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M.i.P Jun 13
The legend of the "mother of sea" in iran: In past, divers, who went underwater without any equipment, reported the existence of a woman under the water who hugged an infant baby. Sometimes she asked divers to make a cradle and then she gave them pearls.
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Maude Frome Jun 12
On the night of the 15th June 1816, while staying at Lord Byron’s villa on Lake Geneva, 18 year old Mary Shelley dreamed of a human-created monster-man. She awoke & began writing Frankenstein. Img: The Nightmare, by Henry Fuseli, 1781
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Särah Nour Jun 12
In Hindu myth, a makara (meaning "water monster" or "sea dragon") is a mammal/fish hybrid with aquatic hindquarters & a terrestrial torso. Usually they're some combination of fish or seal with stag, deer, or elephant.
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Nina Antonia Jun 13
Waterways & Meres in Cheshire were believed to be the home of water faeries known as Asrais, delicate little creatures who rise to the surface once every 100 years to gaze at the moon. If caught out by sunrise, they melt away. Aaahhh
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Jill Hare Jun 13
The Blue Men of the Minch are storm kelpies that lured sailors to their deaths around the Outer Hebrides. Painting by Andrew Viner.
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📚💥Legend of the Lost 💙✍️ Jun 13
An ancient naval tradition the line crossing ceremony is performed when the ship crosses the equator. Originaly a hazing process to transform pollywogs (novices) into bona fide shellbacks it features cross-dressing; Davy Jones & Neptune himself.
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