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JC Steel 1h
What have windmills to do with it, anyway? Read on for the of 'quixotic'...
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The Layman's Linguist 2h
My gateway drug to was ; idioms & inconsistencies are what keep me coming back.
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No'a L. bat Miri 4h
Replying to @WilliamMehrvarz
My favorite part of this was the one that gave me the most grief: finding the meaning/ of the uncommon name "Dalvand." A "dal" is a type of vulture or a type of eagle. The meaning of "dalvand" or "dalwand" is unclear, but implies someone who handles or homes the bird.
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星空みゆき Jun 17
Hoshizora (星空) means "starry sky", alluding to Cure Happy's powers of "holy light".
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geld geld geld geld geld geld geld geld Jun 16
this son is a son of the poetry he never read because is living and you'd know about and we'd transcend the ne ed s to argue every time we fugg. fugg fugg fugg fugg determining direction with an exchange of private something right? w/e hey
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Gazellenlöwe 18h
Thanks for the etymological update.
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Popple Services Jun 17
What does Popple mean? It's a 14th century word meaning to tumble around like bubbles in boiling water. This is so "me" - there's always a bunch of poppling under the surface. Oh ... and I'm a massive nerd What words should be brought back?
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Rite of Word Reviews 8h
excavation - 'fascinating'. What's the word's real origin? Read more:
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Foolproof (Sylvia Suddes) 19h
From the Latin decapitare, from de- (expressing removal) + caput, capit- ‘head’.
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Lydia Utami Jun 12
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Trinity Theatre Jun 17
A really cool look into Toronto history - through !😎
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Arpit Bhayani Jun 13
The word Hazard comes from an arabic word al-zahr (the dice) 🎲 French picked the word as hasart meaning the Game of Dice. As the games were mostly gambling, the sentiment of risk got associated with the word, which was then eventually adopted as Hazard.
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notjustwriters Jun 16
The literal translation of country names. Credit:
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UselessEtymology Jun 13
Because apparently the difference between the Prince of Wales and the Prince of Whales is difficult for some world leaders, here's an lesson: Whales get their name from the Old English word hwæl, which meant both "whale" and "walrus." (thread)
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tash kahn Jun 15
Metaphor = haulage. Love that
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Lexitecture 7h
, we've (finally) got a new episode out! If you know someone who fancies themselves a , or just a fan of , we'd love for you to spread the word(s) about our show! We've officially got 1/10 the Twitter might of , so we're well on our way! 😉🥳
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Grace Tierney Jun 17
Dilligaff is the on the Wordfoolery unusual words blog today. A fun bit of slang I found at 2018 on the art trail.
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Leonashanana Jun 17
I've always been curious to know the of the word "caterpillar": from
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Debborah Donnelly Jun 17
Disasters are all Greek to us
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Zabaan School for Languages Jun 16
From the beginning to the end, in Latin!
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