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Brian Mendler Mar 19
Words all kids appreciate: 1. I love having you in my class. 2. Please & thank you. 3. I believe in you. 4. Here’s one thing you are good at. 5. When I was a kid I did that too.
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Dr. Justin Tarte Mar 16
Shoutout to all the educators who view hallway duty, bus duty, lunch duty, and any other duty over the course of the day, as an opportunity to greet, speak with, and acknowledge students in a non-academic space. There's so much opportunity during these moments.
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Dr. Justin Tarte Mar 18
Have a student you're struggling with & you're out of ideas? Try the 'two-by-ten' strategy: For two minutes each day, 10 days in a row, have a personal conversation with the about anything the student is interested in, but NO school or behavior.
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Amy Greene Mar 23
"To solve a problem as complicated as student motivation, there is no magic bullet; instead we’ll need a set of tools that we blend and refine over time..." , thanks for offering these 5 powerful questions.
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MindShift Mar 21
Research shows that when teachers forge strong relationships with students they learn better. See how these kids start their day.
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MindShift Mar 18
In inquiry-driven classrooms, students are transformed from passive consumers of facts and content into active contributors to the learning experience and the exploration of problems, ideas and solutions
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Tᴏᴅᴅ Fɪɴʟᴇʏ Mar 16
NEW!! 77 ways to say "Good Job!" 👊🏼👊🏼👊🏼 | Brain Blast
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MindShift Mar 19
Teachers say they weave videos into lessons about , and — introducing concepts like gravity, transfer of motion, perspective, quadratic equations, parabolas and the importance of failure and persistence
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Mike Tholfsen Mar 23
Did you know that Word Desktop can open any PDF and then translate to a new language 🌎 with all formatting intact? PowerPoint can do this too! See the video below 👇
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Angela Maiers - Keynote | Author | Change Maker Mar 17
Telling people WHY they matter, rather than just that they matter, changes the game entirely.
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MindShift Mar 17
When students do not understand how their brains learn and retain material, they can develop misconceptions about themselves as learners -- such as a faulty assumption that they are bad at a subject
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Shannon Miller Mar 23
This is such a great list of ways to check for understanding from
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Brian Mendler Mar 21
Say this to defuse an angry student: 1. When did you start feeling that? 2. Do you always feel this about me? 3. I appreciate your opinion. 4. How can I improve? 5. Thanks for trusting me to fix / resolve this after class (walk away).
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Jack Lynch Mar 21
New research shows that in the last decade the rate of incidents has increased alarmingly for children aged 12-17. It’s critical for teachers and to help support students with mental health and wellness lessons.
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MindShift Mar 23
When parents and educators model creative engagement with mathematics, children come to see math as more than simply a set of facts and operations.
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Dr. Justin Tarte Mar 23
One of the most powerful lessons we can model for our is to respond to disappointment in a calm & tempered manner rather than with anger & resentment.
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Eric Patnoudes, M.Ed. Mar 19
Just left a luncheon w/a panel of successful Chicago entrepreneurs. One of the big takeaways was that when hiring, these CEOs are looking for people who are intellectually curious & adaptive learners. Are these qualities we're developing in our students? Our teachers?
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тσм ℓσυ∂ Mar 19
The two most contagious people in your building tomorrow will be the most Positive and Negative person. Fight to be the MOST POSITIVE!
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Dr. Justin Tarte Mar 19
We need to teach students how to question & disagree with adults in a polite & respectful way. Though it’s natural to be defensive when questioned (especially by a ), it may be genuine curiosity to know more. Students also see things from a unique perspective.
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Brian Mendler Mar 20
It’s easy to be respectful to respectful people. Anyone can do that. True character is maintaining respect to disrespectful people.
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