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Dr. Justin Tarte May 19
Each student walking down the hall deserves eye contact and a positive greeting. This is an easy way to model 'adulting' for our students.
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MindShift May 22
We can't assume that students know how to use skills, strategies, and pathways for confronting challenging problems or assignments. But we can teach them
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Brian Mendler May 20
5 Relationship building tips for tough kids: 1. Lead w your real life struggles. 2. Listen to their real life struggles. 3. Care more about kids than content. 4. Be there when things are bad. 5. Surround criticism w compliment.
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MindShift May 19
Unstructured is what prepares a young brain for life, love and schoolwork by changing the neural connections in the prefrontal cortex
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Dr. Marcia Tate May 16
Worrying is counterproductive! It can drain us both mentally & emotionally. When you hit a rough patch and start to worry, just remember to take a few deep breaths and focus on positive actions you *can* take instead of the ones you can’t.
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Jeff Kohls May 21
Great question for the first few days of school...“Who would you like me to call when I have good news to share about how you’re doing in my class?" Why calling parents with positive phone calls is imperative.
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MindShift May 20
Kids are more competent than we think. It won’t help to let a child struggle too much, but entertain the idea that they can handle more challenge than you might think.
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Brian Aspinall May 20
I'm working on a blog post about "traditional" homework. Can I quote you about some alternatives you can share? Can you tell me innovative ways to engage students and parents at home? Thank you! Please retweet! 😁
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Adam Welcome May 20
I'm giving away TEN copies of - to ONE person, so they can do a book study with their friends. . Why do you want ten copies of KDI? . Respond to this tweet and I'll choose one person by this Friday! .
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Brian Aspinall May 19
If you could talk to first year teacher you, what would you say?
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Dr. Justin Tarte May 23
We can’t control the environment our were in prior to coming to school. We can, however, control the environment they experience once they arrive to .
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MindShift May 19
"The change we are seeing is not that kids can't pay attention to things, it's that they're not as interested in paying attention to things. They have less patience for being bored"
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MindShift May 19
"When they know they can trust you and they start to talk to you, their academics start to blossom."
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MindShift May 18
Building begins with , because it's cultivated and nurtured in childhood, write the authors of . But many parents find that hard, since giving kids more control requires parents give up some of theirs
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Dr. Marcia Tate May 20
Your dream isn’t too big—you just need to be persistent and have patience!
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Kimberly Hart May 16
because it helps children perform better academically!
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Brian Aspinall May 21
On the hunt for flexible seating ideas / pics. Anything you can share? Thanks!
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Greg Sederberg May 21
These are some great ways to get students to quickly reflect on/summarize their learning from a lesson. What are some other ways you help students reflect on what they’ve learned?
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MindShift May 22
When kids run around, their brains are getting a bubble bath of good neurochemicals, neurotransmitters and endorphins. These help memory and mood.
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Brian Mendler May 15
✨Im giving away 150 copies of my latest book! 🍎 15 winners get 10 copies for a book study. ✨To Enter: 1. Follow me. 2. Tag one friend on this post who deserves. 3. Retweet. (Ends midnight 5/17).
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