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Doug Gucker Jun 24
Needing forage options for your Prevent Plant acres? Check out latest info
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Jonathan Dansel Jun 23
So...several of my fields of corn are DONE from recent hail...most of the herbicide has been laid down since mid May...what options do I have for or late planted crops with Full-Time and Corvus and atrazine out there?? Will for hay be an option?
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Roberto Peiretti 2h
I continue adding carbon (10 Tn/Ha Stoover) & biological nitrogen to my soils (I planted Hairy vetch- seddlings are showing up on the pict).I am speeding up the virtuos cycle of achieving higher productibity & profit within a sustainable frame
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Steve Groff 16m
Options for spring planted on a veggie farm.
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FarmWeekNow/RFD Radio 33m
Take home lessons on and practices to reduce nitrogen and phosphorus losses field day. Applicable research for S IL soils and conditions
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WayneSWCD 2h
We Are Here To Help!! Contact our office or any conservation district with questions and we will do our best to assist you!
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Bob Haselwood Jun 22
Planted 6/11. Didn’t know what would happen.
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FarmWeekNow/RFD Radio 41m
Research presentations looking at , saturated buffers and WACoBs on water quality and economics in row crop ag.
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Jim Ewing 1h
report outlines economic benefits for
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Millborn Seeds 1h
Piper sudangrass is a warm-season annual, that makes a great forage option. A quick maturing grass with a finer stem, Piper sudangrass will be ready for grazing or hay in late summer.
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Steve Groff 7h
Yes, The amount of water holding capacity is directly related to the amount of Organic matter in the soil. And can help with that!
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Ariel Rivers, PhD Jun 25
Replying to @EntoAriel
Douglass implements before sunflowers, but also experiments on farm with different mixes. They anticipate yield increases, which will offset costs and time for adoption.
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FarmWeekNow/RFD Radio 1h
Nutrient research in notill and tillage systems with research fields. field day focused on S IL soils and conditions
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Steve Groff 2h
Another good minute from this one on grazing
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MSCD Maryland Jun 25
Can you name more than one cover crop, or when it grows and how much water it needs? Popular in our area are corn, , and soybeans. [The Chart is produced & distributed by the staff of the Northern Great Plains Research Lab; Mandan, ND]
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Phillip Alberti 20h
One of the greatest things about working in NW Illinois is seeing the ways producers are experimenting, trying to be better . “Growing” Nitrogen to reduce inputs? I’ll let you know how this little trial turns out. 140lbs N+Clover=?
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Ariel Rivers, PhD Jun 25
Replying to @NRCSCalifornia
Glenn County leads the state of CA in the number of acres of contracted on farm through . Benefits include: reduced erosion, improvement of soil physical and biological properties, nutrient retention, reduced weeds, increased water holding capacity.
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Ceres Solutions 20h
This year’s rye crop looks great! In a few weeks this will be harvested and used on asparagus fields and ground that is getting fall applied manure. It helps to hold the soil in place and manage nutrient runoff
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Quality Liquid Feeds 22h
The latest research from @Rothamstead says conservation areas sited directly next to grassland could be increasing the ‘wrong’ sort of weeds. Do you think cover crops and buffer strips increase your weed burden?
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Ariel Rivers, PhD Jun 25
Replying to @EntoAriel
Cunningham saw stable pasture during historic droughts thanks to and . Similar story when too much rains affected Minnesota farmers in 2018; Cunningham could enter fields to harvest, etc. on time thanks to better .
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