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Challen Willemsen 🌿 Jan 8
The Chinese thuja, Platycladus orientalis, is the only member of its genus in the cypress family. It's commonly planted in Guatemala City, and epiphytic orchids (particularly Barkeria spp.) love it.
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Bob Stewart Feb 7
The U.S. National Arboretum in Washington, D.C. has one of the finest conifer collections in the world. For me the centerpiece of the collection is the "Blue Dragon" a wonderful Cedrus atlantica 'Glauca Pendula'.
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Jesse Bellemare Jan 22
Although best known for woody, seed-bearing cones or , also produce separate, but more ephemeral, pollen-bearing cones. Here the small pollen-producing cones of vietnamensis do their thing at , lit by the afternoon sun.
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Dr. Katarzyna Nowak Apr 3
Alaska and the Yukon really are no ordinary landscapes. See their sheer scale, ferocity, majesty and stark beauty but also the telling signs of fragility and thawing permafrost. A snowy day is that much more appreciated.
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Phil Gates Nov 10
colours of larch needles glowing in this morning's sunshine
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Luke Ruggenberg Sep 19
Positively glowing in a rare evening sunbeam. Cryptomeria japonica 'Knaptonensis' is actually one of the very best for shade.
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UGA Tree Phys Lab Aug 27
Our post-doc Dr. Dave Love is measuring evaporative flux on table mountain pine right now
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Dan Crowley Feb 28
As part of my studies I’ve made a 3 min film on hemlock ID. Check it out here
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PaleontologiaSanRafael Jul 12
In this we want to share a peculiar corresponding to cones from 🌲 (pines, monkey-puzzles, and others). Like trunks, cones can be preserved with great detail. Inside them we can observe seeds and support structures.
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Hippystitch Nov 20
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Karen Hugg Sep 18
Had to do something radical today. Couldn’t find any info on Cupressus macrocarpus ‘Chandleri’ on the net so had to resort to a book! Anyone know this particular cypress? Info still needed.
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Joschua Knüppe May 20
BUSH MADNESS. I have several dozens of these fresh green sauropod buffets to paint.
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Growing the Future | Tyfu’r Dyfodol Jan 8
If you had a real tree and would like to learn more about it and its origins, join 's Science Officer, Dr Kevin McGinn, for a Captivating Course on Thurs, January 24th or Sat, February 9th 🌲 Booking is essential -
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Mary Ann Jul 14
DYK how to ID the lanky lodgepole ? Needles bundled in 2s & are 1.5-2.5 inches long. Cone scales have a bristled tip. Higher elevation; forest character is long, thin, dark & dense. Meyer Ranch, Old Ski Run Trail
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Mohammad Alawfi Aug 1
As part of my project, I’ve made an interactive key to conifers on the University of Reading campus using leaf characters. Check it out here Comments or feedback from users is welcome under this tweet
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Bob Stewart Feb 14
During the winter I tend to pay more attention to the evergreen woody plants. Some of the most interesting are Shown is the Norway spruce cultivar Picea abies 'acrocona', a conifer. However, not ALL conifers are evergreen. 🙂
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Growing the Future | Tyfu’r Dyfodol Nov 20
Captivating Conifers Course at – Sunday December 1 Learn more on , a fascinating group of plants, including cedars, firs, hemlocks, larches, pines and spruces 🌲 Booking is essential - 01558 667150 /
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Tree Stories Oct 30
Unusual to see with autumn colour at Mount Washington Hotel, Bretton Woods, . Conifers with yellow or orange colour are dotted through the forest too, along with the more usual green ones.
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Jesse Bellemare Jan 29
Among , some members of family () are remarkable for degree to which tiny scale-like leaves blur into uniform green photosynthetic branches to naked eye. But gigantea doesn’t risk this- its scale leaves are outlined in waxy glaucous-ness!
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Dario I. Ojeda Oct 11
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