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Andrea Eidinger, Ph.D. 2m
Virtual reality, butter, the Indian Day School settlement, and more, in the latest Canadian history roundup!
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Sloan 14h
2008: recognizes an independent Kosovo. Critics call the action a 'dangerous precedent' for other independence movements around the world--& for Quebec separatists.
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The Agenda | TVO 16h
Barely 19 when he put on the uniform of Canada’s Navy, Liam Dwyer risked it all as a mine sweeper guarding the home front during World War II. The 95-year-old author reflects on that time with , tonight on The Agenda at 11pm | Producer:
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Canada's History 1h
In this article, historian and public speaker advocates for the recognition of female historical figures and gender equality.
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PTBOMuseum&Archives 4h
Day 5: No explanations, no reviews - just the cover. We nominate to take part in the book challenge. Post covers of 7 books you love: one a day for a week, inviting someone each day to do the same.
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Canada's History 3h
that and Canadian history are connected? The first civil governor of Quebec, James Murray was one of many Scots from Jacobite families who were absorbed into the British military following the Jacobite defeat in Culloden.
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Dictionary of Canadian Biography 6h
Bio of the Day: At 17, Charles-Amédée Vallée went to Italy with a detachment of Papal Zouaves to defend the Papal States. Pope Leo XIII later made him a knight of the Order of St Gregory the Great.
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Blake Brown Mar 12
Replying to @RBlakeBrown
Re: Size of SCC. 1875: SCC created with 6 justices. This allowed ties (!) & meant quorum not met if 2 justices absent. 1918 act allowed for 'ad hoc' justices to fill in (from Exchequer Court or provincial superior courts). From 1918-1947, 24 ad hoc judges sat on SCC.
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Blake Brown Mar 12
Replying to @RBlakeBrown
Re: Size of SCC. 7th SCC justice added in 1927; two more added in 1949 - the same year that new appeals from Canada to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council finally ended (though cases already started in Canada could go to JCPC; last one decided in 1959).
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Sloan Mar 16
1946:John Dick's headless, armless & legless torso is found on Hamilton Mtn in Hamilton, ON.The trial of his wife, Evelyn, is a media frenzy, loaded with scandalous truths & gruesome details, but no one is ever convicted of his murder.
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Blake Brown 5h
Replying to @RBlakeBrown
Several SCC judges sat on royal commissions from 1900-1950. Politicians liked optics of justices on commissions but role could damage SCC's reputation. Ex: CJ Duff's 1942 report on Canada's participation in disastrous Hong Kong campaign damned as partial and incomplete.
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Sloan Mar 13
1971: FLQ terrorist Paul Rose is sentenced to life in prison for kidnapping & murdering QC Deputy Premier Pierre Laporte. Rose will be paroled in 1982 after it is determined he hadn't been at the crime scene. He later stated: "I regret nothing."
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Between The Lines 4h
Tonight! Join us for The New Left in Toronto, with Peter Graham, author of Radical Ambition @ Steelworkers Hall !
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Sloan Mar 14
1946:Labour-Progressive MP Fred Rose is found guilty of conspiring to transmit sensitive information about the explosive RDX to the USSR & sentenced to prison for a term long enough to deprive him of his seat in the House of Commons.
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Senate of Canada Mar 13
Canada’s Senate is putting a new twist on the maple leaf:
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Dr. Jessica DeWitt Mar 17
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The Agenda | TVO 19h
Royal Canadian Navy veteran Liam Dwyer describes the sinking of the HMCS Esquimalt off of Halifax in 1945, tonight on The Agenda with at 8/11pm | Producer:
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Dictionary of Canadian Biography 23h
Thanks for the shoutout, ! We love hearing that we are a useful source for those doing work!
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Blake Brown Mar 13
Replying to @macleans
From 1882, Supreme Court of Canada worked in building used earlier as stables/workshop. Did not create a sense of majesty. In 1914 was surprised at “unexpected humbleness” of building which resembled a “lodge at the gate of some great man’s estate.”
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Blake Brown Mar 13
Replying to @RBlakeBrown
At same cermeony, French-Canadian Min. of Justice Ernest Lapointe emphasized British connection. Legal profession to “remain the protagonists of British ideals, of British traditions and of British Justice.” Building completed in 1941 but SCC moved in after WWII.
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