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CarBrochureAddict 6h
This 1980 UK brochure on the Fiat Strada (Ritmo in the rest of Europe) described it as "the evolution of a new, and distinctive species - the car of the future". The company was particularly proud of its use of robots, lasers and computers.
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CarBrochureAddict Dec 13
Traditional Australian-made big saloons inevitably spawned a pick-up (ute) version, which in turn made useful vans. This leaflet features Ford's Falcon Van from late 1984.
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CarBrochureAddict 9h
This 1992 UK leaflet on the Lada Samara Flyte ticks all the boxes for a limited edition model. The cover features a weak pun in its slogan while the car itself has a bodykit, alloys, red detailing, rear spoiler, glass sunroof, leather steering wheel and stereo.
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CarBrochureAddict Dec 11
Assembled from CKD kits at Renault's Belgian factory, the curious Rambler-Renault filled the gap at the top of the French company's range in some European countries. This brochure in German features the 1966 model with 6-cylinder, 3.2-litre engine.
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CarBrochureAddict 12h
With its stacked twin headlights and elegant two-door body, the Alvis series IV (TF) was quietly distinctive and sadly the last of this classic line. Introduced in 1966 as a more powerful version of the TE, it died only a year later when car production ceased.
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CarBrochureAddict Dec 13
You can draw your own conclusions about what the imagery in this brochure says about advertising in the early 80s as well as who Zastava's French importer thought its customers were. The Yugo 55GTL/65GTL were new names for the elderly Fiat 128-derived 101.
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CarBrochureAddict Dec 12
Small Dutch car maker Daf's unique selling point was its variomatic transmission. The 55 moved the company upmarket, with a more powerful 1100cc Renault engine. The saloon and estate were joined by a coupé for the first time. This British brochure is from 1968.
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CarBrochureAddict 15h
Turbocharging was everywhere in the early 80s, with most manufacturers jumping on the bandwagon. This Swiss brochure features the angular second-generation Daihatsu Charade Turbo, with the performance of its 1.0-litre 3-cylinder engine transformed.
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CarBrochureAddict Dec 9
The Austin Maestro was launched with high hopes. Meant to be 'high-tech', it had electronic instruments with voice commands. In the UK this innovation was confined to top models, but this Italian brochure suggests they were more widely offered for export.
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CarBrochureAddict Dec 9
In the 1970s a large number of small coachbuilders were thriving in Italy building all kinds of models based on Fiat's wide range. This is the neat 127 Familiare from Coriasco, for those who thought the factory Fiat 128 Estate was just too big.
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CarBrochureAddict Dec 13
Turkish car maker Otosan, closely linked to Britain's Reliant, mainly built everyday saloons and estates. In 1973 it launched its "halo model", the Anadol STC-16 sports car with the 1600cc engine from the Ford Escort Mexico. Reportedly only 176 were made.
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CarBrochureAddict Dec 6
Ligier, the French company founded by racing driver Guy Ligier, started off making a Maserati-engined sports car, but soon turned to microcars (its business to this day). The 50cc JS4 of 1980 was considered stylish compared to its rivals and sold well.
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CarBrochureAddict Dec 11
This 1969 UK brochure features the Volvo 142 and 144 saloons. Remarkably long-lived as a basic design, the cars (later updated as the 240 series) would carry on with the same basic shape into the 1990s.
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CarBrochureAddict Dec 6
A car's name can sometimes be a deal-breaker with buyers. For example, English speakers may not feel particularly proud saying they own a Wallyscar. Their Izis model, a Peugeot-engined leisure vehicle, is styled with more than a nod to Jeep and made in Tunisia.
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CarBrochureAddict Dec 11
Olympia was an Opel model name dating back to the 1930s which was revived in 1967 for a short-lived luxury version of the company's Kadett mk2. It featured fastback styling for both coupé and saloon models, a seen in this a Dutch brochure.
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CarBrochureAddict Dec 12
Another obscurity from India is this leaflet on the ICML Extreme "conceptualised and engineered in technical collaboration with MG Rover UK". The vehicle's strange two-tone paint scheme is perhaps its stand-out feature.
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CarBrochureAddict Dec 12
We're going back a very long way with this brochure on the Jowett Javelin, one of the most advanced and stylish British cars of the early post-war era. Sadly, Bradford-based Jowett faced many technical problems and the firm ended car production in 1953.
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CarBrochureAddict Dec 6
This BL brochure is in English for the European market, and has amusing pictures set in France showing how a Mini gets you there in a hurry, lessens body roll, sips fuel and carries loads. This may well be the only time a car brochure has featured a 'pissoir'.
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CarBrochureAddict Dec 8
The desirable 1600E version of Ford UK's mk2 Cortina struck a chord with aspirational buyers and provided a blueprint for how everyday cars could be moved upmarket. This early brochure struck a comic note which, in hindsight, seems a bit wide of the mark.
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CarBrochureAddict Dec 6
The Violet (140J/160J) filled the gap between the Sunny and Bluebird in Datsun's 1970s range, and featured typically ornate styling. Curiously the 'Mark II' version in this UK brochure saw the saloon's rear design changed to notchback from fastback.
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