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Helen Chadwick Dec 6
2 common dolphins i attended in Falmouth on Wednesday had obvious signs of . PME was carried out on both where COD was confirmed. Yesterday found another not far out of Falmouth bay with clear evidence of bycatch. Hoping no more show up ☹️
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Marine Connection Dec 18
Female found entangled in discarded fishing line on Tāwharanui beach, New Zealand - the baby dolphin had deep cuts to its mouth, its dorsal fin and tail flukes almost cut in half. Image:Department of Conservation
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Yaiza Dronkers Dec 16
Joint tuna RFMO Working Group kicked off in Porto. Started day philosophically with Esher and selective one-by-one fisheries recognized for low <1% bycatch rates. Time to make business case for gear conversion💡♻️
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Alice Belin Dec 18
Ending is important not only to restore fish populations. Overall it reduces fishing pressure on marine ecosystems with benefits in terms of of sensitive species and restoration of habitats in . It’s not the only measure but it is the 1st measure.
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Jon Lopez Dec 17
Spatial overlap is not equal to risk. The need for accounting for selectivity, susceptibility and post-release mortality to go beyond traditional ERAs. Always a pleasure to listen to my colleague Shane Griffiths.
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Matt Carter Jan 6
Important new study from et al. identifies drivers of in Ireland. Water turbidity an important factor! Could be a similar scenario for seals here in ? Increasing net visibility could be a possible avenue for mitigation...
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Signe Christensen-Dalsgaard Nov 22
The power of necropsies. Following an episode of mass-mortality of gulls in northern Norway, we are now investigating cause of death in the lab. Looks like bycatch in fisheries got the best of these gulls ,
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Dr. Vanessa Pirotta Dec 19
Enjoying over the break? 🦐🤶🌲 If so, take an extra moment to think about how your sea food is sourced. refers to the capture of non-targeted species. We recently published a major study on this focused on in 🇦🇺
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Anne Simonis Dec 9
Dr Charles Anderson tell the session about the 1000s of kilometers of gillnets deployed nightly in the Red Sea, possibly killing 100,000 dolphins per year. This is a big problem for cetacean conservation.
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BirdLife Africa Nov 21
On , we underline the need for sustainable fishing practices, and reduction of . On we highlight some of the measures being taken to minimize in industrial fisheries🌍🐟🐠🐋
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BirdLife Europe & Central Asia Dec 19
The world’s seabirds are being pushed to the brink of extinction by the fishing industry which is competing with them for food, a new study has warned.
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Upwell Turtles Dec 31
Support Upwell's work to protect turtles at sea. We are increasing the understanding of how use marine environments to protect them from threats like fisheries , ship strikes, pollution and climate change. Make a donation at
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Eleonora Panella Dec 5
Solutions are there but states need to act together with
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Alec Moore Dec 13
Great to see this research (re-examining existing data) that helps identify the best practical technology solutions to of groups like on . More work like this needed, especially on inshore gillnet fisheries!
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Alice Belin Dec 9
Dolphin in the Bay of Biscay has been known to happen since 1989. That's 30 years of lack of action from the responsible EU countries, first among which and . Last winter, over 1,100 dolphins died on the French coastline from bycatch. How many this winter?
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FishtekMarine Dec 17
This is brilliant news for seabirds!
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Blue Planet Society Jan 13
Where's the outrage? Where are the legions of animal lovers? Is it only animals with fur that count? The slaughter of dolphins by the fishing industry may be the largest non-cull slaughter of a large mammal on Earth and it's mostly being ignored
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Blue Planet Society 10h
The sea lions’ survival is threatened by many factors, including bycatch in commercial fisheries, entanglement in marine debris and impacts related to climate change.
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FishtekMarine Jan 8
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Blue Planet Society Jan 15
This disgraceful slaughter will remain hidden if we do not hold the fishing industry accountable!
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