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Juita Martinez May 16
Here are some adorable baby dinosaurs to get you through the work week!
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Juita Martinez Jun 12
I introduce to you the newest of dance moves - the pelican waddle! The chicks are mobile now ... growing up so fast.
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Andrew ButleršŸ¦Š 26 Jan 17
Really interesting thread about
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Katrina Hucks 26 Jan 17
were named Louisiana's state bird AFTER their extirpation in 1963. Climate change may cause these birds to disappear again.
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kathy bosin 4 Dec 16
Yes - I've seen on the Eastern Shore this year - first since I moved here in 08.
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Bernie Hilton Nov 16
A visit with the Brown Pelicans Pismo Beach, Ca
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Audubon Louisiana 21 May 18
Weā€™re out at Queen Bess Island this morning taking a look at the Brown Pelican population. How many can you spot?
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DrDADBooks.com Aug 29
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Bernie Hilton Aug 26
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Bernie Hilton Aug 25
Love spending a lazy summer day at Pismo beach with the roosting brown pelicans. The juvies seemed a little bewildered by their pouches!
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Gail Priest 21 Sep 18
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LauraZoellner Artist Nov 4
Hanging with my feathered friends...
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Sandy B. 3 Aug 16
at ~gorgeous day, windy audio (bad iPhone vid) but I was able to catch one in a dive...
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The Water Institute Oct 23
Check out update from Dr. Paul Leberg and student who are studying the impact of coastal island restoration on in south Louisiana to help inform future Coastal Master Plans. Read more:
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Juita Martinez Jun 7
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Debra Martz Jul 26
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Walker Golder 12 Jul 16
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Project Pelican Nov 6
This week, we will be co-organizing the 's Pelicans of the World Symposium: expect tweets about and more pelicans!
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Katrina Hucks 26 Jan 17
Replying to @katrina_hucks
reach adult plumage at 3 years. Here's a comparison of an adult in breeding plumage (white head) & a juvenile (mostly brown)
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Katrina Hucks 26 Jan 17
Replying to @katrina_hucks
forage by plunge-diving from up to 65 feet! They angle left to reduce impact on sensitive parts like the esophagus
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