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Midwest Innocence Feb 11
Reggie Griffin and Joe Amrine met on death row together, before they were exonerated 23 and 17 years later, respectively. Their stories are featured in Kevin Patrick Allen's documentary, "What Comes Next." Stream anytime on Amazon Prime.
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CA Innocence Project Feb 26
This is Quintin Morris with his sister, Billie. He was reunited with her just last month after spending nearly three decades in prison for a crime he didn't commit. Read his story:
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OhioInnocenceProject Feb 3
"Black people in the United States have never been given a presumption of innocence in the criminal justice system. Their entire relationship to justice is not a standard of not guilty, but one of not guilty yet." -- Karen Thompson, Innocence Project attorney
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GA Innocence Project Feb 4
This shouldn’t shock you, but it should enrage you.
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Innocence Project Feb 28
Marvin Anderson spent 20 years wrongfully convicted before he was exonerated with DNA. He is now an project board member and serves as the Chief of the Hanover, Virginia Fire Department.
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Coils & Foils Feb 12
The @innocenceproject is using Black History Month to share what it’s like to be and highlight the systematic oppression that countless Black people face through our criminal justice system. Please follow, support, and learn more about the Innocence Project!
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Innocence Project Feb 27
Stefon Morant, freed in 2015 after 25 years in prison. (Photo )
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Midwest Innocence Feb 19
156 individuals have been exonerated from death row since 1973. For every 10 people who have been executed since the death penalty was reinstated, one has been set free. Will Rocky Myers be one of them?
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Karine Omry Feb 9
No more people serving a life sentence for a crime they didn't commit! is still incarcerated for a crime someone else did, convicted under . Help us bring his case to light!
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سجية Feb 1
“The stark and sobering reality is that, for reasons largely unrelated to actual crime trends, the American penal system has emerged as a system of social control unparalleled in world history.” - Michelle Alexander End
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Karine Omry Feb 6
Kenneth Foster's case is a miscarriage of justice. 22 years behind bars (10 years in the hell of Texas death row) for a crime he did NOT commit, convicted under Please help us bring his case to light!
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Innocence Project Feb 27
Will you stand with us to speak out about racial bias and inequality in the criminal justice system? You can take action now:
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Midwest Innocence Feb 13
"'I’m happy about it, but at the same time it doesn't replace 38 years out of my life,' [Fred] Clay said."
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Willy D. Knows... Feb 1
Replying to @innocence
I think it’s important to also educate the community on what Blacks can do to avoid being caught-up . Criminal prevention is such a missing piece in this ‘survival' conversation.
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Nina Morrison Feb 1
To kick off Black History Month, has posted some revealing data on the disproportionate impact of wrongful convictions on our black clients. It's not history - yet.
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Karen Thompson Feb 1
On this 154th anniversary of the House of Reps passing the 13th Amendment and the first day of Black History Month, today is an important day to look at how racial inequity affects black people behind bars and in the Innocence Movement.
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CA Innocence Project Feb 27
Guy Miles spent 18 years and 10 months in prison for a crime he didn't commit. According to , Black exonerees spend 10.7 years in prison before they're released, vs. 7.4 for white exonerees.
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OAD Feb 28
The criminal justice system persists as a domain of fundamental racial inequality and race-based oppression.
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Real talk💯 I'm just random♡♡♡ social 🦋 Feb 2
first of all thank you for this platform my son is incarcerated due to the fact he pleaded guilty because his lawyer told him he would never win his case he also never fault for my son... My son was never read his Miranda warning or asked if he understood.
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Ojore McKinnon Apr 21
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