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Musa Okwonga Nov 8
“Even today there are parts of my hometown that I can’t go to. That’s a state failure." 👇👇 How did the fall of the Berlin Wall impact Germans of colour?
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Musa Okwonga Nov 11
Sharing this every time it crosses my timeline. It’s essential.
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Laura de Ruiter Nov 7
I was a kid in the early 90s. I remember visiting the zoo in East Berlin with my elementary school class. We didn’t experience physical violence, but neonazis shouted at my best friend (who is biracial) that “n-.. should go away”. It was quite shocking.
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ZEIT ONLINE Politik Nov 7
Wie ist es möglich, dass Talkshows, Bundestagsdebatten, Medien sich der Bedrohung der Meinungsfreiheit durch Linke widmen, während fast unbeachtet bleibt, wie viele Jüngere noch immer aus Angst vor Nazis ländliche Räume verlassen?
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Jane Yager Nov 7
I recommend a scroll through the hashtag if you read German.
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ZEIT ONLINE Nov 7
Unter haben sich bereits Hunderte Menschen gemeldet. Sie erzählen davon, wie sie von Neonazis bedrängt wurden, auf Konzerten, in Bussen, auf Schulhöfen. Endlich.
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Musa Okwonga Nov 11
Replying to @christianbangel
Great news - 's essential essay on neo-Nazi violence after the fall of the Berlin Wall has now been translated into English: - please read and share away. These are such important stories.
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nikolas lelle Nov 5
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Johannes Saal Nov 12
Growing up in the East Berlin neighborhoods of Lichtenberg, Marzahn and Hellersdorf during the 1990s and 2000s' essentially politicized me and many of my friends: either you were a neo-Nazi or you were a potential target and, consequently, fought back.
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Max Bernhard Nov 7
. collected accounts of how neo-Nazis dominated everyday life in East Germany after the fall of the Berlin Wall from hundreds of people
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Goran Buldioski Nov 13
An important read on Germany ‘But one group, those who are most affected by right-wing terror, remained largely silent: immigrants and people of immigrant decent. People like Habib, whose friend Raban shared his story under the hashtag.’
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Özlem Topçu Nov 7
gedruckte Version, heute lesen in ⁦⁩ ⁦⁩ rückt ein paar Dinge gerade
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Nils Nov 12
If you want to understand the far right rise in Germany and especially in eastern Germany, you need to read this article and follow the hashtag about the nazi terror in the 90s
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Frauke Steffens Nov 11
now in English. People are sharing their experiences with Neonazi violence in Germany after the fall of the Berlin Wall.
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Twanna A. Hines Nov 7
Reading: "Did we not learn anything from the rise of neo-Nazis after 1989?" — (in German)
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Paul Zschocke Nov 7
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Ben Scholtysik Nov 11
Replying to @Elektrojunge
3/3 I didn’t tell anyone about this except 1-2 friends. We agree that reporting the incident won’t change anything. There is no account of the incident in the local paper. I should have called an ambulance and the cops and I regret it to this day.
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ZEIT ONLINE Nov 4
Unser Autor teilte einen Text über die Neonazigewalt der Neunziger und Nuller. Und bat andere, ihre Erfahrungen zu teilen. Das Echo ist groß.
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Wolfgang Deicke Nov 5
Under the () invites people to recount their experiences with violence in 1990s Germany (and earlier). 👇🏻
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Aiko Kempen Nov 16
16.11.2009: Heute vor 10 Jahren erschossen russische Neonazis meinen Freund Ivan "Bonecrusher" Khutorskoy. Ich wiederhole mich: Rechte Gewalthegemonie ist unabhängig von Ort & Zeit eine reale Bedrohung. Lasst uns die Geschichten der Opfer nicht vergessen.
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