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☆Matthijs Burgmeijer Jan 12
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AeroJen 🅹 Jan 19
Difference between 2 images in which the dimming of can be appreciated. Betelgeuse itself is dimming mainly due to convection cells in its surface which rise and fall as they heat up and cool down. 1/ Photos & Animation ©Will Gater
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AeroJen 🅹 Jan 1
Replying to @Aero_Jenna
So you see, simply orbiting a star in the habitable zone doesn’t mean that a planet is actually capable of sustaining life. We’re the lucky ones living here on Earth. Maybe one day we’ll discover another exoplanet, just like our home. 7/7
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Lisa Price Dec 17
“Science is not only compatible with spirituality; it is a profound source of spirituality.”
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John Moffitt 🌊 Jan 8
Replying to @JohnRMoffitt
Two dwarf galaxies (The Magellanic Clouds) currently orbiting our own Milky Way Galaxy are only two parts of a smaller galaxy that's been colliding with us since before ancient times ... now ripped apart by our massive gravity.
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David Praise Chukwuma Kalu Jan 3
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John Moffitt 🌊 Jan 8
Things are happening on the outskirts of the Milky Way galaxy. A glimse at our galaxy's local geography.
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Latest in Space Jan 20
During the Apollo 14 mission, Alan Shepard hit 3 golf balls while on the Moon!
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Andrew Laird Jan 8
Speaking of Science from The Washington Post “Astronomers have found a wave of creation in our corner of the Milky Way. It’s a huge river of gas that has the mass of 3 million suns, snaking for 9,000 light-years over and under the galaxy.”
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Georg John Gurhardt Jan 10
Good lord. Learn the science of actual climate forcing. The Sun is the main factor in our climate not the stuff we literally exhale.
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Mario Pawlowski😎 Dec 23
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Lisa Price Jan 11
Our 'pale blue dot' is such an incredible place. And yet we hate, and we fight, and we gradually corrode all that is good about this amazing place. So sad.
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Kirk Borne Dec 18
No matter how elegant a theory is, experimental data will have the last word. Our understanding of the Universe is built on observed, unexpected anomalies. Now comes this cosmological anomaly: ———
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AeroJen 🅹 Jan 15
An artist's impression shows how one of 's ASKAP radio telescope antennas can observe and detect a fast radio burst. Fast radio bursts can release the same amount of energy that the sun releases in 80 years. Artist ©Unknown .If you know him/her, let me know.
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Prof Nick Stone Dec 19
⁩ bringing to the ⁦⁩ community exploring photon migration modelling to help of ⁩ ⁦⁩ ⁦
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James Geary Jan 11
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Latest in Space Jan 12
Approximately one supernova occurs every second. However, the Milky Way only has an average of two supernovae per century.
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Patrick Muncaster Jan 17
Discovering aliens: In the coming decades, next-generation telescopes will scour exoplanet atmospheres for "biosignatures"—cocktails of gases that only can exist in the presence of life
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Kirk Borne Dec 31
Replying to @KirkDBorne
Color-coded illustrates the cosmic origin (“crucible of creation“) for each of the known elements: ——————
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Britannia PR Jan 19
Records Huge Meteor Explosion That Produced Same Force As Atomic Bomb
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