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StrokeAssocNorthWest 18 Jun 18
Over 350 000 people in the UK have aphasia, a hidden disability. Would you ?
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InterAct Stroke Support 10 Jun 19
June is awareness month. We've shared it before but this is a fantastic guide for aphasia, showing how the person with aphasia is approaching your interaction and, in turn, how you might be able to help aid the conversational process.
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⬅️Sherwood Forest Hospitals 😷 NHS FT➡️ 17 Jun 19
Great to see our colleagues promoting at King's Mill Hospital today for
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The Walton Centre 30 Jun 19
It's the last day of Aphasia Awareness Month and Ross from our Speech and Language Therapy team kindly offered to give us an overview of the condition, and how we can support affected patients!
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Say Aphasia 28 Jun 19
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Wes Durham 2 Jun 18
Remember that June is and there are lots of people who can benefit from your contributions and/or volunteer efforts.
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Chest Heart & Stroke Scotland Jun 12
Tam has severe . Watch this video to see how our support worker Darlene helps Tam & has 'a little more conversation' with him. Sound on for Elvis!🎵 The jobs of our support workers are at risk. Please donate whatever you can:
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Carly Davey Jun 26
My mum explaining what it's like to have . I hope this helps the understanding that having difficulty with language after a stroke isn't any reflection on intelligence or all the amazing possibility in Stroke Recovery 💜
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ARC AphasiaRecovery Jun 28
🧠 Imagine....not be able to read this post. Or saying, “I love you.” Words trapped in your mind.
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Chest Heart & Stroke Scotland 3 Jun 18
Fiona had a stroke 9 years ago & was left with . She came to us for help with her communication. “My speech improved so much!” She now volunteers to help others with their communication. It’s let’s raise its profile to ensure
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AHPs4PH Jun 19
A great printable resource to help people with less confidence get on line to be able to access digital resources. from
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Emma Richards Jun 20
Look at these amazing pictures! We asked the online aphasia group to write or draw how it feels to have to show the rest of the group. Amazing!
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Chest Heart & Stroke Scotland 5 Jun 19
Tom had a stroke in 2016 & is living with . Aphasia can affect your ability to understand, speech, read or write. Tom's top tips on speaking to someone with aphasia: 1. Stop & slow down 2. Don’t use jargon 3. Be patient & put yourself in their shoes
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Prof Katerina Hilari 14 Jun 19
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Joanie Scott 27 Jun 18
Talking to someone with : Reduce background noise Get their attention (say their name) Wait Speak slightly slower, use plain language Allow time to process and respond Use gestures/drawing/writing Remember Aphasia does not affect intelligence
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Chest Heart & Stroke Scotland 10 Jun 19
People with may have difficulty communicating and can feel as a result. Our new ‘Talk With Me’ app helps with conversation through symbols & pictures. Download & share to help someone communicate today:
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RCSLT policy 25 Jun 18
isn’t the only cause of . People may have aphasia after a head injury, brain tumour or neurological disease. helps people to strengthen & regain their language abilities & learn other communication methods, it also has economic benefits
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Carly Davey Jun 29
This morning we went through all the comments & lovely feedback on the "What's it like to have " video 💜 It has been shared widely especially in the SLT and research world which is brilliant. A little message from Jan 😊💜
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Joanie Scott 29 Jun 19
Hope to see lots of people in the survivor family at on Monday and Tuesday. and I will be on stage on Tuesday so I hope you can be there!
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Joanie Scott 27 Jun 19
My experience of caring for someone with includes: Realising what’s really important in life, being time-rich, a profound closeness, finding inner strength, worrying less about housework and grammar (!), laughing, sharing, learning to let go.
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