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christopher marshall Feb 12
Hey, hi, hello, I'm here! Really loved the recent blog on illustrating mental health topics. This one was my favrourite.
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Sarah Knowles Feb 12
“I feel a tremendous responsibility to find and develop visuals that represent the many different/varied versions of people’s experience of mental health problems and not a corporate or clichéd version.” we’re exploring this tonight, 8pm
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Cochrane UK Feb 12
We've got a few questions to go through this evening, so we'll move on to question 2 now... What sort of images do you find most relatable? Don't forget to use the hashtag in all tweets.
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Cochrane UK Feb 12
Shall we kick off with question number 1... What do you find most off-putting when you see mental health portrayed visually? Don't forget to include the hashtag in all tweets.
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Cochrane CMD Feb 14
"The involvement of children & young people is critical for doing research that is meaningful & relevant in improving their mental health and wellbeing": & blog for & 's series
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Emerging Minds Network Feb 14
is a new special series from & , sharing research & reflections on children & young people's mental health & tell us what's in store & why it matters
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Geoff Miller Feb 12
..and not just great suggestion!
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Cochrane UK Feb 10
What do you find most off-putting when you see portrayed visually? What sort of images do you find most relatable? Join us for a tweetchat using , on Wednesday 12th Feb at 20:00 GMT (15:00 EST) as we discuss this & more.
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Jess Hendon Feb 12
Thanks everyone here is one of my favourite images from Annina designed in partnership with to finish off tonight's tweetchat
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Sue-Ham 6h
Still tear up about this.... 3-4 years ago....
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christopher marshall Feb 12
Replying to @CochraneUK
I really liked some of the examples in the blog. Very striking and powerful. I really like this one for some reason too.
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Geoff Miller Feb 12
Replying to @CochraneUK
As others havee mentioned the images so often used. Portray negative aspects of mental health, rather than the strength and resilience often required day to day.
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Andy Feb 12
Replying to @CochraneUK
I was going to nominate this one but the use of the word help arguably creates a victim mindset.
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Noortje Feb 12
Replying to @CochraneUK
Could we use images of people doing mundane things like walking/ working/ sitting in class/ chatting? Because I think not everyone with mental health problems is lying in bed all the time
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Vartika Sharma Feb 14
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Sarah Knowles Feb 12
And point 2, on graphic memoirs, I wrote this years ago and keep meaning to update it if anyone fancies delving into graphic novels about mental health
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Cochrane UK Feb 12
Okay so next question, now that we've shared some ideas of what can be off-putting when illustrating mental health topics... Question 3. Can you share examples of what you think works well? Don't forget to include the hashtag in your replies.
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Cochrane CMD Feb 12
We feature this image by in our blog. Even though the image evolved from an earlier version we ended up taking the cautious decision not to use this as the lead image for one of our information summary about a depression review. Were we right?
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Jess Hendon Feb 12
Replying to @CochraneUK
What do people think about crying in images? personally I find that off-putting. I also don't like the stereotype of dishevelled clothing etc.
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Cochrane UK Feb 12
Here's what said about the image: “I made this image to illustrate my initial indiscriminate internet searches for information about my OCD. It’s authentic: my feeling at the time was that I was drowning in a sea of confusion and misinformation.
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