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Diana Rodgers, RD Sep 10
Only a small % of what cattle eat is grain. 86% comes from materials humans don’t eat.
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sijnevanderbeek Jun 21
telling audience that we in Europe (with the exception of Ireland) are not optimally utilising our pastures. We can learn from countries like New Zealand (and Ireland)
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Ilse Fraeye Jun 21
Enjoyed a very informative and convincing symposium organized by BAMST and today : Yes, ruminants do have a place in healthy and sustainable diets!
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Aly Balsom Jun 21
Let’s changing thinking on Methane from cows.CO2 lasts 1,000yrs. CO2 produced from fuels has nowhere to go + persists. Methane only lasts 10year, is converted to CO2 + absorbed by plant, eaten by ruminants + released as methane + the cycle continues. Ag is cyclical.
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Fiona Windle Jun 21
Cyclical system, maintained herd sizes=no global warming, carbon sequestration, biodiversity contributor, nourishing and tasty food supply, natural fertiliser source - myriad of reasons ruminants have a role in our global food supply Thanks for a great preso
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Liam Stokes Jun 21
What I heard at the symposium: ruminants are essential to circular ag. Capping consumption is not necessary. Instead we need to innovate, to mitigate the "shadow" of ruminants so they can continue to upcycle inedible cellulose into nutrition for a growing population.
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Tommy Boland Jun 21
A fantastic analogy from if total global area is represented by an A4 sheet of paper, the area of land available for cropping is represented by 1/3 the size of a business card. The remaining 2/3 of that business card is used for grazing.
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Louise Stephen Jun 21
Currently tuned into this 👇 Plenty of very important ‘global vegan’ myth busting going on.
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Conor Mulvihill 🐄 Jun 21
Hugely interesting presentations from the led seminar with high level academics from the UN and around the world dispelling myths around ruminant agriculture. Yes huge challenges- needs science led debate.🐮 Follow live here:
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Liam Stokes Jun 21
Oxford Uni's Dr Michelle Cain did an epic job of explaining the hellish complicated topic of CO2 equivalence, and how methane gets misrepresented by commonly used metrics.
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Peter Österberg, Ph.D. Jun 21
For health, environmental, and climate reasons, there are good arguments (quantified data) to continue consume animal fat and meat.
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Ruaraidh Petre Jun 21
Grasslands are an important part of European nature. This is illustrated by the fact that about 50% of the endemic plant species of Europe are dependent on the grassland biotope.
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Fiona Windle Jun 21
40% of food is wasted in the US supply chain, or 1 in 3 calories. About 50% fruit and vege, 20% meat
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COPA-COGECA Jun 21
Great discussions on the role of ruminants in sustainable diets at event! Prof A. Mente presented PURE studies which show that there is no benefit replacing saturated fats with polysaturated fats- underlining that meat & dairy contain high nutritional values!
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MEAT Jun 21
Dr Anne Mottet, FAO: 86% of what livestock consumes globally is non-edible.
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Stephan Peters Jun 21
Eating by the rule 'less animal, more plant-based' is not a guarantee for a more sustainable diet with less ecological impact. In contrary, is some cases it results in a higher impact '
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Frédéric Leroy Jun 24
If you've missed our conference "Role of ruminants in sustainable diets" (June 21st): here are the videos! PART1 🎬 - Introduction, Prof. F. Leroy - Prof. A. Mente - Prof. F. Mitloehner 🌱🐄🥛🥩
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Hendrik Dierendonck Jun 21
“ 1 year eating meat gives 400kg CO2 emissions.... 1 flight Brussels to Rome gives 500kg CO2 emissions per Passenger “
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Martin C Th Scholten Jun 21
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sijnevanderbeek Jun 21
at the stage to explain that ruminants are essential for food security and resource security
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