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Angie Sep 10
Saw this beautiful Dragonfly yesterday, unfortunately not very clear, ID please anyone πŸ™πŸŒΏ
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=== Geoff === Sep 11
Not the most picturesque place for a Clouded Yellow to sun itself. But it is definitely yellow. ☺
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Martine Sep 11
This Buttercup was a bad choice of nectar for the little hoverfly.....
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Christine Weaver Sep 11
Woundwort shieldbugs crawling over woundwort seed heads and perched on the tip of a nettle leaf
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MagandLil Sep 11
is a brilliant idea. We love it! πŸ₯°It has made us look more, when out and about at how wildlife depend on each other. There have been some great photos and examples! Thank you
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Roger Robinson Sep 11
Assumed common carder bee on knapweed and a hoverfly enjoying one of the few remaining flowers of rosebay willowherb, seen yesterday on Stockbridge Down.
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Moira O'Donnell Sep 10
The Ivy Bee, Colletes hederae, is the last solitary bee to emerge each year, and is Britain's only true autumn bee. Ivy is its main pollen and nectar source. There were lots on the Ivy flowering near Crayford Marshes at the weekend.
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Moira O'Donnell Sep 10
The day-flying Latticed Heath moth, enjoying the Sand Lucerne at Crayford Marshes.
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Is Mise Leenie Sep 11
from Cloghan, Co. Offaly...
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Michael Hoit Sep 11
Getting your face into a patch of ivy is a great way to find lots of nice things at this time of year. As well as food, many insects use it for sunbathing. Pictured: hoverflies Dasysyrphus albostriata & Myathropa florea & a centurion sp. soldierfly (Sargus sp)
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David B Burbridge Sep 8
Ivy, Hedera helix - always feels a bit autumnal when this and Ivy bees arrive, berries will be black and the birds need them to get through winter!
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David B Burbridge Sep 11
A late leafcutter bee for , on a plant of the daisy family. A bit worn and faded, but definitely female (orange brush for collecting pollen), large, possibly Megachile ligniseca, Wood-carving Leafcutter
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Jane Lucas Sep 11
Alder leaf beetle (Agelastica alni) on alder (Alnus glutinosa) leafs. A pest of alder and other deciduous trees.
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Jane Lucas Sep 11
A Sycamore (Acer pseudoplantus) showing tar spots. A disease caused by the fungal pathogen Rhytisma acerinum, which infects Acer species
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Rachel Scopes Sep 11
Flowering ivy provides nectar for many insects, such as these closely related hoverflies: Volucella zonaria - Hornet Hoverfly - huge! Chestnut markings on abdomen; Volucella inanis - Lesser Hornet Hoverfly - smaller, yellower
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Tina Sep 11
A Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta from my wildlife book not me!) on blackberries. Many of these butterflies arrive from the continent in spring but adults hibernate and are able to survive the British winters in increasing numbers apparently!
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Angela Williams πŸŒˆπŸ¦πŸ‘’πŸ¦† Sep 10
Lots of lovely Lichen on Hawthorn for
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Nichola Hawkins Sep 11
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Angela Williams πŸŒˆπŸ¦πŸ‘’πŸ¦† Sep 11
Hover fly on White Herb robert & White lipped snail πŸ€” on thistle
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Roger Robinson Sep 11
Two 'shieldbug' type creatures, on agrimony and bramble, seen during a short walk from the house (N. Hants) this afternoon. Does anyone know what they are? - when I look at the books I seem to invariably find either too many or no possibilities!
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