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Louise Bell Jan 15
I went to visit this wee exhibition yesterday, when I was , which has some lovely objects on display!
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LondonNurse2016 26m
Dangers for Front line ambulance staff based at dressing station May 1915
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Deborah Cameron 1h
Lots of stories, photos and info on women in in the UK, especially in the home front on my FB page. Very active members (over 1000) take a look!
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Men, Women and Care 11h
Data entry from today and a diagnosis of 73% disability for a gunshot wound to the right leg, fracturing a fibula. This is quite specific as a percentage disability.
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Olly Skillman-Wilson 1h
11-11: Memories Retold An aircraft hangar in Germany. This is a zeppelin skeleton seen from the inside, mid-construction. The enormous balloons that will fill it are made from 250k cow guts stitched together. The smell is horrendous.
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York 1914 5h
Treating the casualties of led to medical developments and innovations including blood banks and replacement body parts. Discover more in our exhibition .
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WFA East London Jan 15
Reminder - 7.30 this Thurs 17 Jan, Cricket Club. Fantastic ex-local teacher Martin Spafford’s talk: Meeting in No Man’s Land. British and German descendants remember . All welcome.
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Oxford WW1 Centenary Jan 10
Want to preserve your community’s stories, memories and objects? Sign up for our *FREE* online training session (21st January, 10am-12pm), which will equip you with all the knowledge you will need to host your own Digital Collection Day.
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Elizabeth Smith 5h
Completely by chance, met Martin as he was leaving today. He gave me a quick tour - lots of history here! Great to hear about plans for the Roll of Honour in the entrance. Looking forward to visiting properly when the museum reopens in Spring.
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CheshireRemembers 3h
The project has reached a small but significant milestone, we now have identified over 1,000 of those named on the memorial came from Cheshire. Just over 10% of these have a photograph. Over the coming months this number will continue to rise
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Rachel Johnson 1h
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Alex Souchen 5h
About to teach my first lecture in The Two World Wars lecture highlights include Franz Ferdinand's bloody tunic and the Schlieffen Plan!
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Joy Parry 1h
Poignant Silhouettes in the pews at ..... in memory of those who didn't return: J Childs, R Harvey, BJ Muriel, W Pye, R Scott, G Spinks & F Watts J Hedge, J Neal, B Oliver & C Scott
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Ark Victoria Academy 7h
Year 6 created an art installation inspired by and artists. They used their painting skills to create a background for their piece using imagery from pictures of the trenches. The silhouettes of the soldiers symbolise the innocent lives lost during both and .
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Jane Lawson 2h
Flying visit this morning to Tower Hill memorial to fact find prior to renovation works starting. Thanks to lovely guys on site who climbed down to help me when I hollered from the ground!
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Heritage@WSHC Jan 9
What of the legacy of 4 years of commemorations? reflects on the work of local history societies, schools, community groups & individuals. What will future generations find when they look for evidence of how we remembered?
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LondonNurse2016 23h
Sister Adrienna Tupper (13 Oct 1859-9 Dec 1916) Bridgewater, Nova Scotia Died on active service at Hillingdon House, Canadian Hospital Buried Uxbridge cemetery with full military cortege and buglers played the last post, the grave marked with a simple Sicilian marble cross
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Islington Museum 5h
A big thanks to all those who helped on and contributed to our centenary exhibition 'Raids, rations and Rifles: Islington during the First World War', which ended yesterday.
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LanguagesFWW Jan 14
Swearing among the forces and munitions workers so prevalent that post-war returning soldier campaigned to stop it
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Melina Druga 5h
"The two World Wars were some of the first true industrial wars, forcing leaders to innovate so they would lose fewer troops and have a chance at victory. Here are just seven of the crazy jobs that were created"
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