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Andre Sias May 29
You are correct. A alumnus. Operation enduring freedom veteran
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @michelle_furlow
A more complex issue is the use of excessive force.
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @michelle_furlow
The most popular conducted energy device (CED) is the familiar Taser
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @PoliceFound
Thank you for the for an excellent Use of Force Infographic that we will be referring to extensively through the duration of this discussion
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @michelle_furlow
Excessive force and abuse of authority take on several forms
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @michelle_furlow
Officers should avoid deadly force if too much time has elapsed between the crime and the use of deadly force.
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @michelle_furlow
I hope this look at Police Use of Force was informative and broke down some common misconceptions. Let me know if you have ANY questions!
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @michelle_furlow
Medical examiners have attributed some Taser-related deaths to a condition known as excited delirium, an overdose of adrenaline that can occur in heated confrontations with the police.
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @michelle_furlow
We want police to control crime and preserve our liberty. But when the ends become more of a concern than the means, inappropriate or excessive force is a likely result.
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @michelle_furlow
In the 1989 case of Graham v. Connor,34 the U.S. Supreme Court declared that claims of excessive non-deadly force must be judged under the Fourth Amendment’s reasonableness clause.
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @michelle_furlow
Force may involve hitting; holding or restraining; pushing; choking; threatening with or using a baton, a flashlight, or chemical or pepper spray; restraining with a police dog; using a Taser; or threatening with or using a gun.
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @michelle_furlow
Following investigations of the Branch Davidian compound at Waco, Texas, and Ruby Ridge, Idaho, the federal government announced that it was adopting an “imminent danger” standard for the use of deadly force by federal agents
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @michelle_furlow
Untrained bystanders may fail to understand that what an officer did to apprehend a resistant suspect followed the police agency’s policy to the letter. Justifiable force is not applied arbitrarily.
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @michelle_furlow
Police officers have particular difficulty dealing with instances of suicide by cop, in which individuals who are determined to die engage in behavior that causes responding officers to resort to deadly force
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @michelle_furlow
Although relatively few police officers ever fire their weapons at suspects during the course of their careers, those who do may become embroiled in social, legal, and personal complications.
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @michelle_furlow
In a study reported in 2001, Alpert & Dunham found that the force factor, the level of force used by the police relative to the suspect’s level of resistance. is a key element to consider in attempting to reduce injuries
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @michelle_furlow
Use of force and use of excessive force are not one and the same.
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @michelle_furlow
Deadly force as force that is likely to cause death or significant bodily harm. Non-deadly force is basically the opposite: force that is unlikely to cause death or significant bodily harm
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @michelle_furlow
A suspect can also pose a serious threat based on his or her past conduct or based on the nature of the crime in question. Less serious offenses, in general, do not enhance the police authority to use deadly force
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Prof. Furlow's Whiteboards May 28
Replying to @michelle_furlow
The “fleeing-felon rule” held that officers could use deadly force to prevent the escape of a suspected felon, even when that person represented no immediate threat to the officer or to the public
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