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Alan Boyle Nov 8
Watch Mercury make its transit across the sun online - or in the sky, if you're lucky and careful:
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Alan Boyle Nov 10
Reminder about the in the morning: Don't gaze directly at the sun, find a star party if you can, and watch it online to be safe and sure:
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NOAA Satellites Nov 12
Yesterday's was tracked using 's Solar Ultraviolet Imager () to see the tiny planet moving across the face of the . The event lasted roughly 5 1/2 hours. The next won't happen again until November 2032.
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Maria Popova Nov 10
Beginning at sunrise, a rare . The tiny black dot of the innermost planet traverses the face of our star, dragging with it the history of our hunger for truth, the history of our genius and our fallibility. Read on:
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NASAJPL Edu Nov 7
It's a you can see! Don't miss the chance to engage students in STEM when Mercury transits the Sun on Monday, Nov. 11! Learn about the science, find out how to watch and explore related lessons from here:
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Time Out London Nov 5
There won't be another until 2032!
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Katie Mack Nov 11
time at ! Telescopes courtesy of — lots of excitement here!
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Katie Mack Nov 11
Today there was a AND ! What are the odds? 100%. Every time a transit occurs, Mercury is in “retrograde,” because when it’s between us & the Sun, our relative motion make it look like it’s going backward. (It’s not.)
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Katie Mack Nov 11
The is a big deal because it's a rare event. The alignment only happens 13 or 14 times per century, and the next one won't be till 2032. It's also great for science because astronomers can use it to study Mercury's (very thin) atmosphere.
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David Blanchflower #NASASocial Nov 11
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chrislintott Nov 11
Successful viewing outside Said Business School in oxford. Come see us!
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Jason Major Nov 11
Folks are here enjoying a great view of the from Pawtuxet Village!
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Holly Menninger Nov 11
And there was much rejoicing! Clouds broke for a gorgeous view of at the 🔭
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Royal Museums Greenwich Nov 10
Join expert astronomers live as we broadcast the using our state-of-the-art telescope from the Royal Observatory. Watch from 12.25PM on 11 November 2019, live on Facebook:
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Cassini Nov 7
On Monday, Nov. 11, beginning at about 7:35am ET (12:35 UTC), the planet Mercury will pass directly in front of the Sun. This event is called a transit, and the next visible in the U.S. won't be until 2049. See how to watch, safely:
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UoYPress Nov 8
On 11 November the planet Mercury will sail across the face of the sun - an event that won’t repeat for another 13 years. Dr Emily Brunsden tells us about
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Lou Brutus Nov 11
TRANSIT OF MERCURY: Here's my humble image of the Mercury Transit 2019. The planet is the tiny speck near the center of the Sun. I'm shooting through cloud cover which is why I assume I'm not also seeing the sun spot activity.
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Scott Sutherland, Meteorologist/Science Writer @🏠 Nov 11
Here's the entire in just 10 seconds! (images c/o NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory)
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Jan Hattenbach Nov 11
Clear skies but terrible seeing for on : Single exposure 1/3200s at f/6, 420mm ISO 400!
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Slooh Nov 11
members are capturing hundreds of photos of the so they can make their own animation of the event using Slooh's new Quest animation module!!
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