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Martyn Stott Jul 19
This picture says it all . Be proactive!
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Anand Badri MD Jul 16
If you have random free time during your day as an intern, go around and “social round” on your patients. Talk to them about their lives, their experiences, their fears. Seems like a small thing to us, but it can mean the world to your patients.
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Sarah Marsden Jul 16
A few specifically new A&E doctors after my 6 months there. First up: love your nurses! A&E nurses are a different breed. Unflappable, experienced, and have a wicked sense of humour. Work well with them and they’ll have your back. 1/n
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James 🏳️‍🌈 #FBPE Jul 13
In any clinical situation ask yourself 2 Qs: 1. Will I sleep soundly in my bed tonight as a result of the clinical decision I’m making? 2. Is the level of care I’m giving one I’d be happy for my own Mum to receive? Seek help if “No” to either of the above!
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Pino Jul 18
you are not above making tea for a patient, or putting up the fluids yourself. Learn how to work the pumps and stop the beeping. Oh god the beeping.
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Sam Ghali Jul 15
Dear New Doc, There will be times when you’ve run out of doctor things you can offer the patient. Always remember to offer the human things: 1. Empathy 2. Kindness 3. Compassion
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Andrew Morris Jul 14
Keep your pharmaceutical apps close but your pharmacist closer: they will save your hide (repeatedly), teach you, and (if you’re lucky) befriend you.
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Philip Lee Jul 18
Since this is going to do the rounds again, I thought I'd share this and at least get the credit for it
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David Puls, DO Jul 13
If you see a farmer in your clinic during harvest season, he’s about ready to die.
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Dan Thomas Jul 15
hand over all jobs (however small and inconsequential they may seem) in front of the SHOs and SPRs they can help you identify what actually doesn’t neeed doing at all (also some of those small things handed over FY1 to FY1 turn out to be really sick people!)
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HJMale Jul 17
Delivering bad news: 1: talk slowly and clearly 2: pause often. 3: allow uncomfortable silence, the best questions come from this 4: be prepared and know the details, talk to who you need to before you walk in the room.
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Foiz Ahmed Jul 18
At this time of year, with the going round, I will once again give my ONLY piece of advice on this matter. Don’t be a dick. That’s all you need to know for medicine (and for life.)
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Liz Lemon, MD Jul 17
Don't leave all your evaluations until the end of the year so that you end up doing 60 all at once and regretting all your life choices
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Philip Lee Jul 20
especially those doing emergency medicine: don't be a dick to ambulance crews. Whatever you have to do, they have to do whilst kneeling in cat poop/in the rain in the dark on the roadside/having abuse hurled at them by a drunk person.
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Dan Thomas Jul 13
remember competence and rudeness don’t overlap much on the venn diagram The nice approachable doctors tend to be clinically good The consistently rude unapproachable doctors tend to be the ones that are a bit “dodgy” clinically too
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Andrew Morris Jul 17
When a pt. becomes bacteraemic a week into antimicrobial therapy (ie “breakthrough bacteraemia”), it’s usually not a failure of the treatment, but a failure to correct the underlying problem.
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Gabriel Bosslet Jul 20
Often the most helpful notes are the ones written by social work. I often learn a ton about a patient’s worldview with what social workers are able to glean. Should be required reading for all housestaff.
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Dave N Jul 17
New FY1 docs starting in August: 2 simple questions to help you be AWESOME on surgical ward round: 1. Exactly where are my patients & what is wrong with them? 2. What operation have they had / about to have? Or none? Know the answers & all will become easier!
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MMMC Pharmacology Jul 11
A Navy SEAL was asked, why do you train in such extreme conditions? He replied “Under pressure you don’t rise to the occasion, you sink to the level of your training. That’s why we train so hard.”
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Chris Bailey Jul 19
Normal saline sucks. Don’t use it as your default IV fluid order on your patients. Read up on the SALT and START trials as to why.
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